Advertisement

Whiskey Byproducts Could Become Car Fuel

⚡️ Read the full article on Motorious

This is a pretty interesting development…


Biofuels are all the rage these days, with many preaching their attributes. There are many ways to craft biofuels, including a scientist who thinks a byproduct from making whiskey could be used to fuel your vehicle. We guess you could try justifying your consumption of whiskey as contributing to the future of biofuels, or you could just admit you like how it makes you super witty and funny.

Find the Motorious Podcast on your platform of choice here.

To be clear, this wouldn’t involve pouring whiskey into your car’s gas tank. Instead, the biofuel would be made using the draff leftover from the distilling process. This scientist reportedly found a way to ferment draff, transforming it into biochemicals useful for running diesel cars.

The advantage of biofuels is supposed to be the lower carbon content versus fossil fuels. Some fear emitting too much carbon into the atmosphere is contributing to global warming, although that hasn’t been accepted unanimously among climatologists, even though many politicians have forged ahead with laws as if decreasing carbon emissions is like turning down the planet’s thermostat. In other words, biofuels might be a really great thing or they might just be another source of fuel.

Biofuels are definitely in their infancy, accounting for around 3 percent of fuels used globally. Critics say they will never be able to supply all the energy needed in the world. Proponents still think they’re a viable future alternative fuel.

Draff remains after the liquor has been drawn off. It constitutes around a quarter of all the malt and unmalted cereals used to produce whiskey. Currently, it’s a popular cattle feed product. Now, the question is what will dairy farms and ranches which depend on draff do if it becomes popular for fueling cars? That’s an important question since burning the food for our food could be problematic.

We’ve been told some draff is just dumped in lakes, rivers, or the ocean if it’s not ditched in landfills. We can’t verify if that’s true or just something environmental activists say to try trashing the whiskey business. If there is any truth to that, maybe this biofuel angle would change things for the better.

Source: WECT

Image via Pexels

Sign up for the Motorious Newsletter. For the latest news, follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.