Shot clock at Texas high school basketball games? The UIL has that option in 2022

·2 min read

One of the biggest discussion points among Texas high school basketball coaches and fans is the shot clock.

Should the game have it or continue without it?

Well, beginning in 2022, the UIL has that option.

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) announced on Wednesday that a 35-second shot clock will be permitted in high school basketball games by state associations beginning in the 2022-23 season. The NFHS said on its website that a proposal for a national rule mandating a shot clock was not approved.

Only nine states currently use a shot clock at high school basketball games: Georgia, California, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, North Dakota, Rhode Island, South Dakota and Washington.

Texas isn’t one of them and while the UIL follows NFHS guidelines when it comes to high school sports, the league organization said in an email on Thursday that “it is not considering implementation of the shot clock for basketball at this time.”

“However, the UIL is a member driven organization that considers opinions from all stakeholders including coaches, coaching associations, administrators and officials to ensure every decision is in the best interest of member schools. We will continue to listen to the concerns of these groups,” said Dr. Charles Breithaupt, UIL Executive Director.”

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.

The UIL recently conducted a three-year trial that allowed schools to experiment using a shot clock for tournaments, but the league said that “the shot clock was not substantial enough to justify pursuing the matter further.”

“We will continue to monitor this issue in the coming school year,” Breithaupt said. “The UIL is constantly adapting to changes in the playing rules for each of our sports and we are interested in changes which keep a balance between offense and defense in team sports. UIL staff has studied the issue of the shot clock in basketball for several years and we do not consider these changes for entertainment purposes. Rather, we study what is best for boys and girls basketball in Conferences 1A-6A.”

This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
This content is not available due to your privacy preferences.
Update your settings here to see it.
Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting