P.E.I. crafters looking for location to sell goods this holiday season

·2 min read
Alanda Rideout-Drost, who runs Island Pebble and Sea Glass Art, is trying to find a consistent location for small local vendors to set up in Charlottetown. (Tony Davis/CBC - image credit)
Alanda Rideout-Drost, who runs Island Pebble and Sea Glass Art, is trying to find a consistent location for small local vendors to set up in Charlottetown. (Tony Davis/CBC - image credit)

It has been about two years since some people on P.E.I. who make crafts have been able to attend a fair due to COVID-19.

Alanda Rideout-Drost, who runs Island Pebble and Sea Glass Art, said she is worried many large local craft fairs will be cancelled again heading into the holiday season.

"This year we have already been notified the school ones have cancelled and there is not much left," she said.

Rideout-Drost said she wants to create a location for local crafters to sell their goods during the holiday season — sharing costs on rent so artists could make a bit more money.

Tony Davis/CBC
Tony Davis/CBC

She has called some property owners in Charlottetown who have vacant commercial space, but she hasn't had much luck.

She said the property owners are looking for a longer-term arrangement.

"We just need a three-month place to host or have a gift shop for Islanders," Rideout-Drost said.

She posted on social media asking if other crafters on P.E.I. would be interested. She said over 50 companies were interested, but she's trying to target smaller artists. For them, the holiday season could be one of the few times they can make a good income.

"I'd like to reach out to the crafter who completely rely on craft fairs and school craft fairs to sell their product," Rideout-Drost said.

Natasha Affleck of Glitter Ghost Clothing and Accessories said she joined up with some crafters on something similar last year and it helped her get through the season.

Glitter Ghost Clothing and Accessories
Glitter Ghost Clothing and Accessories

"In a normal year you could have a market every weekend so it's quite a difference to have most of them cancelled," she said.

It can be hard to stay motivated when preparing for fairs that are likely to be cancelled, Affleck said, and having a consistent location to sell goods would help many vendors.

"I find that makes a huge difference, even if they are going to look, they see your stuff and they remember you. It's just nice to have a spot where you actually kind of have that new foot traffic you would from a market," Affleck said.

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