'I will not': Glenn Close says she refused to cry as vice president in 'Air Force One'

Cydney Henderson, USA TODAY
·2 min read

Glenn Close envisioned a strong female vice president for her role in the 1997 film "Air Force One."

Close played United States Vice President Kathryn Bennett alongside Harrison Ford's President James Marshall, whose plane got hijacked by terrorists. Close's Bennett remained calm and stoic while monitoring the hijacking in the White House's Situation Room, but that wasn't always her fate.

While looking back at her esteemed career during an interview with Vanity Fair, Close revealed that she fought to change the script in the political action thriller.

"One thing I remember was they had a scene around that table where she broke down crying,” Close recalled. "And I said, 'I will not do that. I don’t think that would happen. Not my vice president. My vice president would not break down into tears, she would step up to the challenge.'"

Close added, "So they changed it."

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Close's revelation comes weeks after Kamala Harris made history as the first woman elected vice president, alongside President-elect Joe Biden.

"My heart is so full. Like so many of of us I feel I can breathe again," Close captioned photos of Biden and Harris on Instagram Nov. 7 following their victory.

Seen here at this year's Screen Actors Guild Awards, Glenn Close is going for Oscar nomination No. 8 with "Hillbilly Elegy."
Seen here at this year's Screen Actors Guild Awards, Glenn Close is going for Oscar nomination No. 8 with "Hillbilly Elegy."

She continued: "So much to be done to cross the great divides between us, but how blessed we are to be able to face those challenges as citizens of a true democracy who will continue to fight for liberty and justice for us all."

Close is currently starring as Bonnie "Mamaw" Vance in Netflix's "Hillbilly Elegy," which is directed by Ron Howard.

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Glenn Close refused to cry as vice president in 'Air Force One'