New Movies: Release Calendar for February 26, Plus Where to Watch the Latest Films

Kate Erbland
·47 min read

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Staying home? Good. Looking for something new to watch while you do it? Even better! As the world continues shifts to accommodate a wide range of in-home viewing options for movie lovers, it’s not just platforms that are expanding, it’s the very type of films they host. There’s more than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that.

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This week’s new releases include streaming originals, fresh VOD offerings, some major awards contenders, festival favorites, and new studio releases now available in the comfort of your own home, plus a variety of exciting virtual cinema picks. Browse your options below.

Week of February 22 – February 28

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry” (directed by R.J. Cutler)
Distributor: AppleTV+
Where to Find It: Select IMAX theaters, streaming on AppleTV+

A year-in-the-life documentary that observes Billie Eilish’s meteoric stardom in such extreme close-up that everything around her eventually fuzzes out of view, R.J. Cutler’s epic yet bracingly intimate “Billie Eilish: The World’s a Little Blurry” knows that whatever makes its subject so fucking interesting is already self-evident to the people who hear themselves in her music. And it’s only because his film accepts that truth from the start — only because it doesn’t bend over backwards to bring their parents into the fold, or try to explain Eilish’s appeal to an audience who has never seen the world through those ocean eyes — that it’s able to smudge it into something big enough for anyone to appreciate. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Cherry” (directed by Joe and Anthony Russo)
Distributor: AppleTV+
Where to Find It: Select theaters, available to stream on AppleTV+ on March 12

It’s safe to assume that Nico Walker knew his life story could make for a good movie in the right hands. By the time he finished up his prison sentence in Ashland, Kentucky, he was waiting for the publication of the semi-autobiographical novel he’d written from jail about the wayward journey that had brought him there in the first place. The book was called “Cherry,” and the bestseller’s instant success would earn enough to afford its 33-year-old author — a former Iraq War Army medic, opioid addict, and mild-mannered bank robber in that order — a second chance to be all that he could be, even before directors Anthony and Joe Russo paid him $1 million dollars for the film rights and turned it into their first post-“Avengers: Endgame” production. Suffering through the Russo brothers’ scuzzy, interminable, and misjudged adaptation of Walker’s life story, there’s no question who got the better end of that deal. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Crisis” (directed by Nicholas Jarecki)
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Select theaters, with a VOD release to follow

Claire is an architect, mother, and recovering Oxy addict attempting to balance her life. Tyrone is a college professor who researches new medicines for a major conglomerate. Jake is a DEA agent posing as a drug trafficker who wants to bring down two major smuggling rings. Bill is a high-powered executive eager to push through his allegedly non-addictive new painkiller. Connected both loosely — often, very loosely — and sometimes inconceivably, by the raging opioid epidemic, each of the characters in Nicholas Jarecki’s scattered “Crisis” is at the mercy of appetites they can’t control. Taking an apparent nod from “Traffic,” though without its finesse or sprightliness, Jarecki attempts to weave together a star-packed, multi-pronged narrative to shine a light on the nation-spanning opioid crisis, but emerges with only a muddled, curiously restrained final product. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Father” (directed by Florian Zeller)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“The Father” is a slippery film in which even the most basic information can be vaporized in the span of a single cut, but there’s no ambiguity to the fact that Anthony Hopkins plays the title role (although it might be worth noting that the character’s name has been changed from Andre to Anthony, a self-reflexive detail that adds a crunchy meta core to one of the movie’s most harrowing moments). Anthony is not well, but even that much isn’t clear at first. For better or worse he still has the vim and vigor of a much younger man, but his mind is a leaky ship in search of a lighthouse surrounded by jagged rocks. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“My Zoe” (directed by Julie Delpy)
Distributor: Blue Fox Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Neatly and purposely divided into three acts — a black screen signals the lag time between each, should the viewer not be ready for the required understanding that things are about to change, and that it’s best to prepare now — Julie Delpy’s fascinating “My Zoe” uses its classic formal structure to tell a thoroughly modern tale. While Delpy’s directorial output thus far has mostly consisted of fizzy rom-coms like her “Two Days” features and the odd historical drama (“The Countess”), “My Zoe” finds the filmmaker and star moving fast into fresh territory. One part domestic drama, one part medical mystery, “My Zoe” subtly spins those two acts into its final segment: a contemporary thriller with morals and medicine on its mind. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Night of the Kings” (directed by Philippe Lacôte)
Distributor: NEON
Where to Find It: Select theaters, available on PVOD on March 5

Male hierarchies inside prison walls are well-trod ground, from “Brute Force” and “Birdman of Alcatraz,” to “Papillon,” “Midnight Express,” and “The Shawshank Redemption.” But rarely is an entry as visually rapturous as West African filmmaker Philippe Lacôte’s “Night of the Kings,” which takes place inside the bowels of the infamous La MACA prison in Abidjan, a city on the south side of the Ivory Coast. While the film, both written and directed by Lacôte, is grounded in oral traditions that may seem exotic to certain viewers, the movie is really about the universal power of storytelling regardless of tongue — and how it can be used as a way to survive. Though hampered by some shaky third-act visual effects, “Night of the Kings” is through and through an intoxicating and immersive visual experience even as it unfolds almost like a filmed play. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Tom and Jerry” (directed by Tim Story)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Select theaters and streaming on HBO Max

There’s little in the following hour and forty minutes that shows any more sense of purpose, a hodgepodge of story and sight gags that goes together about as well as its attempts at combining live action and animation. It’s a “Tom and Jerry” movie that, for some reason, opts to focus on a pair of fictional Instagram celebrities and the ins and outs of hotel administration, whether or not the computer-generated cat and mouse implied by the title happen to be involved. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The United States vs. Billie Holliday” (directed by Lee Daniels)
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

A feverish and fitfully compelling biopic that spreads over the last decade of Lady Day’s life, Lee Daniels’ “The United States vs. Billie Holiday” frames the government’s war on the smoky-voiced jazz singer as a portrait of two bad romances told in parallel: one, a forbidden spark between an African-American icon and the undercover fed who may have fallen for her, and the other an unrequited love story between them both (and the country that refuses to love either of them back). In a way that won’t surprise anyone familiar with the director’s ever-florid work, the acute geometry of that premise is expressed through — and often betrayed by — the general shapelessness of a hot-house melodrama that embraces its namesake’s “all or nothing at all” ethos to a fault. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Vigil” (directed by Keith Thomas)
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

Set almost exclusively within the confines of the shadowy home, “The Vigil” suggests the potential for a new angle on “The Conjuring” universe via Jewish guilt and Holocaust trauma. And if “Conjuring” owner Warner Bros. doesn’t ingest its lore, Keith Thomas has ample potential for a new franchise of his own. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Pelé” (directed by Ben Nicholas and David Tryhorn)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“Safer at Home” (directed by Will Wernick)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Ski Bum: The Warren Miller Story” (directed by Patrick Creadon)
Distributor: Discovery+
Where to Find It: Streaming on Discovery+

“Tyger Tyger” (directed by Kerry Mondragon)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Wrong Turn” (directed by Mike P. Nelson)
Distributor: Saban Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

Also available this week:

Erēmīta (Anthologies)” (directed by Sam Abbas)
Where to Find It: Various virtual cinemas, including New York and California

“The Independents” (directed by Greg Naughton)
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of February 15 – February 21

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Blithe Spirit” (directed by Edward Hall)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

At just 95 minutes, the film’s relatively short running time still feels stretched to the limits. A decided lack of dizzy, silly, fizzy screwball fun beyond a few scattered moments doesn’t help matters. Dan Stevens, Isla Fisher, and Leslie Mann might be a strong fit for the original material — can we cast them in a remake of this remake? — but this bloated, limping version of Noel Coward’s play seems oddly disengaged from what made the source material so delightful in the first place. It’s the cinematic equivalent of day-old champagne: the taste is almost there, but the bubbles disappeared long ago. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I Care a Lot” (directed by J Blakeson)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Rosamund Pike, again capturing the cold, often very funny sociopathic tendencies of Amy Dunne in David Fincher’s vicious “Gone Girl” adaptation. No one is having as much fun as Pike here, gliding through self-made carnage in crisp monochromatic suits and spotless sneakers, utterly untouched by the pain she’s inflicting. While Pike has enjoyed a career that’s been quite varied and often sadly overlooked — both a “Bond girl” and an Oscar nominee, she’s done everything from biopics to streaming series, period pieces to flashy action films, and she’s consistently been the best thing in just about all of them — she remains known to most audiences for her awards-winning turn in “Gone Girl.” It’s easy to imagine an alternate cinematic world in which Amy went on to become Marla. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Flora & Ulysses” (directed by Lena Khan)
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Streaming on Disney+

A tonally faithful adaptation of Kate DiCamillo’s novel of the same name; screenwriter Brad Copeland has altered some of the book’s dramas, though the overall look and feel of the story remains: Gussied up with the antics of an animated superhero squirrel, it’s really about facing deeply human challenges head on. It’s a strong fit for Disney+ and its fledgling original film slate, which traffics in younger-skewing offerings with important lessons for the little ones. So far, it’s seen mixed results. For every charmer like “Stargirl” or “The One and Only Ivan,” there’s a “Safety” or a “Godmothered” (or, heaven forbid, an “Artemis Fowl”) there to temper the Mouse House’s original streaming quality. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Joe Bell” (directed by Reinaldo Marcus Green)
Distributor: Solstice Studios
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Early in Reinaldo Marcus Green’s delicate drama “Joe Bell,” the eponymous Joe Bell (Mark Wahlberg) — thought not yet “good” enough — makes a promise to his family. “I’m going to try to be better,” the small-town husband and father vows, and such is the theme of this true life story, a wrenching examination of the price of forgiveness, and how even the best of intentions may not ever be enough. While formulaic on its face, Green’s film resists the sort of obvious cinematic catharsis expected of such a story, resulting in a final product that earns its emotional beats. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Nomadland” (directed by Chloé Zhao)
Distributor: Searchlight Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters and streaming on Hulu

Chloé Zhao previously directed “The Rider” and “Songs My Brother Taught Me,” dramas that dove into marginalized experiences with indigenous non-actors in South Dakota. “Nomadland” imports that fixation with sweeping natural scenery to a much larger tapestry and a different side of American life. Inspired by Jessica Bruder’s non-fiction book “Nomadland: Surviving America in the 21st Century,” the movie follows McDormand as Fern, a soft-spoken widow in her early 60s who hits the road in her van, and just keeps moving. The movie hovers with her, at times so enmeshed in her travels that it practically becomes a documentary. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Truth to Power” (directed by Garin Hovannisian)
Distributor: Oscilloscope
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

At first glance, it’s tempting to call “Truth to Power,” a documentary about the music and activism of System of a Down frontman Serj Tankian, the “Last Dance” of music docs. Impressive archival footage can’t disguise how overly reverential a treatment Garin Hovannisian’s film is. That’s not surprising considering that, like “The Last Dance,” its subject was an instrumental part of its making. Tankian reached out to Hovannisian to initiate the project, and had even scored two of Hovannisian’s previous movies. That cozy relationship has a cost: as with “The Last Dance,” “Truth to Power” is a promotional film, not a work of journalism. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Violent Heart” (directed by Kerem Sanga)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

For the majority of its running time, “The Violent Heart” appears to have more in common with the sullen indie romances of today than it does with the star-crossed theatrics of yesteryear. Set in the rolling nowhere of rural Tennessee, Sanga’s twinkling Southern tragedy — his first movie since 2016’s excellent “First Girl I Loved” — gives us a teenage girl with the world at her feet, an older boy with a lifetime of pain over his shoulder, and a synth-driven John Swihart score that swirls around them like a funnel of windswept leaves whenever they hold each other close enough to get hurt. She’s a white high school senior and he’s a Black 24-year-old ex-con working as a mechanic at the only place in town that will hire him, but those aren’t the differences that ultimately threaten to tear them apart. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Body Brokers” (directed by John Swab)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Silk Road” (directed by Tiller Russell)
Distributor: Lionsgsate
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Test Pattern” (directed by Shatara Michelle Ford)
Distributor: Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

First-time feature filmmaker Shatara Michelle Ford squeezes a lot out of 82 minutes. In “Test Pattern,” a perceptive and often quite painful examination of sexual assault, relationship dynamics, racial divides, and the corrosive power of violence, the writer and director mines a dizzying amount of topical issues, tying them all up as a compelling two-hander to boot. Despite the density of their subject, Ford avoids heavy-handed platitudes and dramatic tropes, instead relying on a strong script and a pair of sneakily powerful performances from stars Brittany S. Hall and Will Brill. The result is a showcase for the film’s central trio, one that resonates long after the film’s slim running time concludes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“17 Blocks” (directed by Davy Rothbart)
Distributor: MTV Documentary Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of February 8 – February 14

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Barb and Star Go to Vista Del Mar” (directed by Josh Greenbaum)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

The “Bridesmaids” DNA is all over this one, which retains the strong affection and respect for female friendship that underpinned the 2011 comedy hit (a trait woefully missing from so many films in the genre), but couches that same dynamic in silly, strange, and just plain bizarre new twists. It seems odd to deem any film an instant cult classic, but “Barb and Star” is such a giddy outlier, a dense, flawed assemblage of zany humor that people will happily tear into for years to come. Bumps and all, “Barb and Star” is a wholly unexpected combination of “MacGruber,” “Pop Star,” and “Despicable Me” (yes, really) that operates entirely on its own wavelength. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Breaking News in Yuba County” (directed by Tate Taylor)
Distributor: MGM
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

February is the cruelest month for new film releases, and director Tate Taylor’s “Breaking News in Yuba County” is easily one of the worst cinematic gestures of the year so far. Allison Janney, Regina Hall, Juliette Lewis, and a cast of many more familiar (and typically welcome) faces lead a big ensemble of unlikable, unsympathetic characters in a deeply unfunny media satire that’s a mess from top to toe. It’s the kind of movie that seems to suck your soul out while you’re watching it, variably crass and slapstick humor landing with a bloody thud. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Cowboys” (directed by Anna Kerrigan)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms, plus choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Evoking the magic of this charged classic, “Cowboys” is a modern day buddy Western that puts the complicated father figure and his adoring trans kid at the center. The first feature from writer/director Anna Kerrigan, “Cowboys” is as sweeping in grand landscapes as it is delicate in scope. Kerrigan’s script keeps the focus tight on four main characters, effectively crafting a satisfying adventure into a subtle excavation of masculinity — the good, the bad, and the ugly. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“French Exit” (directed by Azazel Jacobs)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Death is always just a few dollars away in the wry and beguiling “French Exit,” a musty tragedy of manners that director Azazel Jacobs and his longtime friend/sometime collaborator Patrick DeWitt have adapted from the latter’s novel of the same name. For Frances — who a serrated Michelle Pfeiffer plays like an intoxicating cross between Selina Kyle and Luann de Lesseps — the dwindling stacks of cash in her bedroom closet are the last grains of sand in an hourglass turned upside down more than a decade ago, when Big Frank died and she pulled Malcolm (Lucas Hedges) out of boarding school because she needed someone new to love her. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“I Blame Society” (directed by Gillian Wallace Horvat)
Distributor: Cranked Up Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms, plus choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Genuine compliments are in short supply in Hollywood, so it’s easy to understand why struggling filmmaker Gillian (Gillian Wallace Horvat) can’t shake the ones she does receive — even the strange ones that might creep other people out, like that she’d “make a good murderer.” Gillian is so taken with this little piece of praise — and that she considers it praise is perhaps the first thing you need to know about her — that she opts to turn it into the driving force behind her next project, a mockumentary following her exploits to become a (fake) murderer in a town built almost entirely on artifice. What follows is a biting, often hilarious send-up of the Hollywood machine that sees Horvat gamely tackling everything from bad pitch meetings to true crime obsessions and the corrosive power of creativity, all in one original package. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Judas and the Black Messiah” (directed by Shaka King)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Select theaters, streaming on HBOMax

Fred Hampton is looking for revolutionaries. William O’Neal is trying to stay out of prison. In Shaka King’s vivid “Judas and the Black Messiah,” these seemingly very different men will be set on a terrible collision course for each other. One part Hampton biopic, one part unnerving portion of American (and all-too-recent) history, King’s drama is a nuanced portrait of a people, a place, and a betrayal that has never before received such a full telling. Bolstered by major performances by Daniel Kaluuya (as Hampton, the visionary chairman of the Illinois chapter of the Black Panther Party in the late ’60s) and Lakeith Stanfield(as O’Neal, an FBI informant who infiltrated the BPP and Hampton’s inner circle), “Judas and the Black Messiah” makes the Hampton saga feel as urgent — and tragic — as ever. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Land” (directed by Robin Wright)
Distributor: Focus Features
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Early in Robin Wright’s “Land,” as her Edie (Wright) trucks out to middle-of-nowhere Wyoming, a brief flash of fear passes over the filmmaker and star’s face. For a moment, it seems, even Edie is terrified at the desolation of the world around her, of the terrible isolation she has prescribed for herself. It doesn’t go any further than that, just one small look, but it hints at a more honest film buried underneath a too-familiar grief drama. While Wright, making her feature directorial debut with tough material, exhibits an appealing unfussiness, so much of “Land” is painful not for its subject matter, but because of its predictability. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Lapsis” (directed by Noah Hutton)
Distributor: Film Movement
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms, plus choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Noah Hutton’s feature debut takes place in a “parallel present,” but nothing about clever sci-fi dramedy “Lapsis” feels that removed from the contemporary world. Smartly weaving together questions of corporate greed, a cheeky bitcoin stand-in, and social justice issues that don’t feel shunted in just to be “timely,” “Lapsis” is as much about the tightly constructed world Hutton has created as the one his audience lives within. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Map of Tiny Perfect Things” (directed by Ian Samuels)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon

Another year, another “Groundhog Day” rip-off. Nearly three decades after Bill Murray got stuck in a time loop until he became a better man, the concept has spawned so many iterations that it basically exists as its own genre, mixed and mashed with other tropes to reanimate a familiar routine. Often, the deja vu of watching these movies mimics the predicaments of their characters, even when they’re halfway decent. The latest to take the rom-com approach, “The Map of Tiny Perfect Things,” offers an agreeable kind of breezy, soul-searching variation, but can’t break free of the overwhelming meta impression that we’ve seen this all before. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Minari” (directed by Lee Isaac Chung)
Distributor: A24
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Told with the rugged tenderness of a Flannery O’Connor novel but aptly named for a resilient Korean herb that can grow wherever it’s planted, Lee Isaac Chung’s semi-autobiographical “Minari” is a raw and vividly remembered story of two simultaneous assimilations; it’s the story of a family assimilating into a country, but also the story of a man assimilating into his family. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Music” (directed by Sia)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

Why did a mega-talented pop star cash in all her chips to make a movie that plays like an unholy cross between Zach Braff’s “Wish I Was Here” and Lars von Trier’s “Dancer in the Dark”? Why, against the advice of virtually every living human and the last vestiges of whatever common sense modern civilization has left, did she cast her able-bodied, neurotypical teenage muse Maddie Ziegler as the nonverbal autistic girl whose name lends the story its title? Why does the script feel like an inspirational Instagram post that was brought to life by a witch’s curse? Why don’t any of the film’s stultifying dance sequences even try to advance the plot or allow its characters to meaningfully express how they feel inside? Why do all of them look like rejected Target commercials from a dystopian back-to-school campaign that was commissioned for the kids in “Logan’s Run”? Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Saint Maud” (directed by Rose Glass)
Distributor:
A24
Where to Find It:
PVOD via Epix

A slender but unholy cross between “First Reformed” and “The Exorcist,” Rose Glass’ taut and trembling “Saint Maud” transmutes a young woman’s spiritual crisis into such a refined story of body horror that genre fans might feel like they’re having a religious experience. Of course, even the most overzealous viewers will find there’s always room for doubt — and that’s where the Devil gets in. A palliative care nurse in a dreary town somewhere along the British coast, the intensely devout Maud (a divine Morfydd Clark) is doing her best to seal the area around her soul. That seems to be one hell of a struggle. Soft-spoken but vibrating with serial killer intensity, Maud seldom opens her mouth when she’s not talking to God inside her acetic little apartment, reminding her lord and savior that she was meant for something greater. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“To All the Boys: Always and Forever” (directed by Michael Fimognari)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

“To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before” and its sequel were nothing if not dependable. When we last left star-crossed teens Lara Jean Song Covey (Lana Condor) and Peter Kavinsky (Noah Centineo), the couple at the heart of Netflix’s most charming YA series had overcome (yet another) near-fatal relationship misunderstanding. For a romance built on miscommunications and cute complications, “To All the Boys: P.S. I Still Love You” offered up more of the sweetness of its predecessor, with a gentle nudge into grown-up concerns. Similar issues frame the final entry in the film trilogy based on Jenny Han’s popular books, which is also touted as the conclusion to the series. “To the All the Boys: Always and Forever” marks the longest entry in the franchise, and it certainly feels it — especially through a middle both overstuffed and inert — but its otherwise keen energy often keeps it afloat. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The World to Come” (directed by Mona Fastvold)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“The World to Come” is so withholding that the characters from “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” are practically sky-writing their emotions by comparison, and Fastvold’s film — despite its delicate lilt of a last scene — never detonates inside of you with remotely the same force. It’s jabbing and elliptical instead of lush and symphonic; old-fashioned where some of its predecessors have thrummed with contemporary zeal. No one filters drugs through armpits, or scissors their bodies into shapes that Abdellatif Kechiche might cut together. On the contrary, Abigail and Tallie are seldom onscreen together at all, and only in hindsight can we appreciate how charged the space between them is when they are. Fastvold shoots the movie at a polite and unfussy remove, the fuzzy vibrations of Andre Chemtoff’s 16mm cinematography hinting at an energy invisible to Abigail and Tallie’s husbands. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Dead Pigs” (directed by Cathy Yan)
Distributor: MUBI
Where to Find It: Streaming on MUBI

“Fear of Rain” (directed by Castille Landon)
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“Hopeless Romantic” (directed by Deanne Foley, Martine Blue, Stephanie Clattenburg, Latonia Hartery, Ruth Lawrence, Megan Wennberg)
Distributor: Game Theory
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

“The Wake of Light” (directed by Renji Philip)
Distributor: Axis Pacific Filmworks
Where to Find It: Various VOD and digital platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Red Post on Escher Street” (directed by Sion Sono)
Distributor: Grasshopper Film
Where to Find It: Available to rent as part of Japan Society’s series “21st Century Japan: Films from 2001—2020”

An exhilarating postmodern comedy about people fighting for every moment of screen time they’re able to wrest from this stupid world before they have to leave it, “Red Post on Escher Street” is the best argument for Sion Sono’s vital body of work since 2015’s “The Whispering Star,” and a perfect opportunity for newcomers to get their toes wet. While the riotous likes of “Love Exposure” and “Tokyo Tribe” have been fueled by the sheer exuberance of Sono’s cinema, “Red Post on Escher Street” is so much fun for how it celebrates that exuberance as an end unto itself — for how, to an even more self-reflexive degree than the great “Why Don’t You Play in Hell?,” it uses the filmmaking process itself as a lens through which to focus our attention on the pure force of will that Sono brings to everything he does and to all of the characters through which he does it. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Leona” (directed by Isaac Cherem)
Distributor: Menemesha Films
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

Week of February 1 – February 7

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Bliss” (directed by Mike Cahill)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon

Writer-director Mike Cahill has long been obsessed with stories that explore the line between what’s real and what’s not, yet “Bliss” contains none of the sparks — emotional or intellectual — that made Cahill’s previous features, if not successful, at least interesting to watch. “Another Earth” was about good people laboring under extreme circumstances, while “I Origins” was about curious people attempting to untangle deep mysteries. Greg (Owen Wilson, miscast) and his eventual partner in exploration, Isabel (Salma Hayek, also miscast), are neither good nor curious. Worse, the concepts they explore are often both silly and insulting. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Earwig and the Witch” (directed by Gorô Miyazaki)
Distributor: GKIDS
Where to Find It: Select theaters, streaming on HBO Max

To watch “Earwig and the Witch” — Studio Ghibli’s first fully 3D computer-generated feature, and its first feature of any sort since the informal pause that followed 2014’s “When Marnie Was There” — is to know how Miyazaki felt that day. While “Earwig and the Witch” is far from the ugliest film of its kind, there’s something uniquely perverse about seeing Ghibli’s signature aesthetic suffocated inside a plastic coffin and sapped of its brilliant soul; about seeing the studio’s lush green worlds replaced by lifeless backdrops, and its hyper-expressive character designs swapped out for cheap dolls so devoid of human emotion that even the little kids look Botoxed with an inch of their lives. This is the cartoon equivalent of that botched Jesus fresco, only lacking the human touch that gave that debacle some perverse charm of its own. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Falling” (directed by Viggo Mortensen)
Distributor: Perceval Pictures and Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

Ostensibly a drama about a married gay liberal who struggles to care for his homophobic father during what might be the final days of his life, Viggo Mortensen’s first effort behind the camera never settles into the expected grooves of its genre or premise. On the contrary, the film vibrates at its own unrecognizable frequency as soon as it starts, and only allows for easy categorization during the clunkier moments when it bumps against clichés like a boat that would rather crash into lighthouses than use them for guidance. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“A Glitch in the Matrix” (directed by Rodney Ascher)
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

The so-called “simulation theory” has floated around in various forms for millennia, but became more pronounced after the success “The Matrix” encouraged many viewers to question the reality of their surroundings. Drawing on interviews with 10 experts and internet theorists with an endearing mashup of film clips and trippy 3-D animation, “A Glitch in the Matrix” adapts to the internal logic of its echo chamber until starts to sound pretty convincing on its own terms. If you’re not already one of the diehards convinced we’re living in a simulation, this movie might actually get you there. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Little Fish” (directed by Chad Hartigan)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

Chad Hartigan’s clever sci-fi drama “Little Fish” sums its chief concerns in one grim line: “When your disaster is everyone’s disaster, how do you grieve?” A change of pace for the director of “Morris From America,” Hartigan’s weighty romance takes place in world afflicted by memory loss, with all the devastating results implied by that premise. Beautifully acted and grounded in relatable emotions despite the lofty premise, “Little Fish” plays as both an effective metaphor for Alzheimer’s, and the disintegration of a relationship without closure or reason. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Malcolm & Marie” (directed by Sam Levinson)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Here is a movie with so many conflicting takes on the overlapping natures of artistic and romantic collaboration that it can only end once Sam Levinson’s sweatiest thoughts have wrestled each other to an exhausted stalemate. Despite the undeniable charge of watching the “Euphoria” creator fashion such a flamboyantly romantic spectacle during the sterility of our Zoom year (a far cry from the back-to-basics brilliance of the recent episode he made for the HBO show during its COVID hiatus), Levinson’s high-contrast, low-reward drama is also a stunning example of how airless a film can become when it’s shot in a bubble. And for all the lightning-in-a-bottle energy that jolts this glitzy experiment to life — an electric current that John David Washington and Zendaya carry from station to station like a third rail — the whole thing is suffocated by the same oppressive solipsism that Malcolm and Marie are both trying to solve for themselves. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Minimata” (directed by Andrew Levitas)
Distributor: MGM
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

Some stories of real-life heroism beg to be told, while films like “Minamata” fall victim to good intentions. Director Andrew Levitas’ mopey drama recounts war photographer W. Eugene Smith’s seminal expose of mercury poisoning in the eponymous Japanese fishing village, and certainly that 1972 photo essay deserves a feature-length salute. However, it doesn’t benefit from a haggard Johnny Depp as Smith, growling through a half-hearted impersonation as the movie dials up the maudlin. Here and there, “Minamata” tells a bracing story of corporate malfeasance and bracing advocacy for the underclass, but even the occasional poignant observation can’t salvage a movie trying this hard to tug every heartstring at its disposal. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Wanting Mare” (directed by Nicholas Ashe Bateman)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

It’s been ages since anyone built a complex sci-fi universe fillled with far-reaching mythology and imaginative threats. “The Wanting Mare” tries to get there by starting with a small dose. Writer-director Nicholas Ashe Bateman’s ambitious debut plays like the tiniest sliver of a vast universe, an intimate futuristic drama painted into the corner of some giant canvas yet to be seen. Seeing as most sci-fi franchises on movies and TV stem from existing IP, “The Wanting Mare” scores points on ingenuity alone as the most intriguing form of world-building in the genre since “The Matrix,” though it begs for a bigger picture. Frustrating and immersive in equal doses, Bateman’s slow-burn drama seems content to show us around, with the occasional conflict as an added bonus. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“4×4” (directed by Mariano Cohn)
Distributor: Red Hound Films
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Dara iz Jasenovac” (directed by Predrag Peter Antonijević)
Distributor: 101 Studios
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“PVT Chat” (directed byBen Hozie)
Distributor: Dark Star Pictures
Where to Find It: Select theaters

“Rams” (directed by Jeremy Sims)
Distributor: Samuel Goldwyn Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

“The Reckoning” (directed by Neil Marshall)
Distributor: RLJE Films, Shudder
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

“The Right One” (directed by Ken Mok)
Distributor: Lionsgate and Grindstone Entertainment Group, a Lionsgate Company
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus VOD and digital options

“Strip Down, Rise Up” (directed by Michèle Ohayon)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Two of Us” (directed by Filippo Meneghetti)
Distributor: Magnolia Pictures
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

A tender and unexpectedly suspenseful lesbian romance that ages the furtiveness of so many queer love stories until it’s subsumed into the frailty of “Amour,” Filippo Meneghetti’s “Two of Us” is at heart a film about how those choices can get harder over time, petrify around people as the years wear on, and — Meneghetti quite literally suggests — even paralyze them into running out the clock. It is often a good one, worthy of being selected as France’s official Academy Awards submission from a field that was light on major contenders, and especially so before its most pivotal character loses her ability to make any choices at all. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Week of January 25 – January 31

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Beginning” (directed by Frank Dea Kulumbegashvili)
Distributor: MUBI
Where to Find It: Streaming on MUBI

From the horrifying sting of its first shot to the becalming ethereality of its longest take, Dea Kulumbegashvili’s film doesn’t simply trap its heroine in a home she longs to escape, it also uses the severe narrowness of these images to isolate her from other people, to articulate the desires she’s smothered in the name of maternal servitude, and to attack her from just beyond the limits of what she’s able to see. In “Beginning,” the borders of the frame aren’t just the iron bars of a jail cell, they’re also the garden walls of Eden, the tempting hiss of the snake, and the angel of the lord who interrupted Abraham from killing his son. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Dig” (directed by Simon Stone)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Select theaters, streaming on Netflix

In “The Dig,” when various characters make their way out to the location that gives the film its name, the sky is rarely the same. As the story progresses from a one-man job that may or may not validate a widower’s curiosity to a more momentous historical find worth dramatizing over 80 years later, the clouds over Suffolk come and go, with all the corresponding shades overhead.

That simple avoidance of painting this whole tale with a single brush is one key way that director Simon Stone zags against some of the standard pitfalls of historical retellings. (Though, to be clear, the film is not without at least one literal pit fall.) Based on the 2007 John Preston novel of the same name, “The Dig” also takes its cues from the details surrounding the 1939 Sutton Hoo discovery, which found centuries-old remnants of a past civilization buried beneath unassuming mounds on the property of Edith Pretty (Carey Mulligan). Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Little Things” (directed by John Lee Hancock)
Distributor: Warner Bros.
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus streaming on HBO Max

A slow-burn serial killer saga that leans into genre clichés like they haven’t been bludgeoned to death yet, John Lee Hancock’s “The Little Things” isn’t just set in 1990, it was also written in 1990. And it wasn’t just written in 1990, it still feels like it could’ve been made then, too — an unambiguous positive at a time when most straight-to-streaming fare is so cheap and glossy that it makes 20th century shlock like “Kiss the Girls” and “The Bone Collector” feel like Visconti movies by comparison.

But really it’s “Se7en” that comes to feel like the most obvious antecedent of all, even if that epochal hit came out a few years after Hancock first hatched the idea for this one. Here is another vivid, patient, character-driven psychological thriller that sees its A-list cast as a license to subvert audience expectations, prioritize the detectives over the murderer they’re trying to catch, and offer a gruesomely dark vision of the world that focuses its lens on how the light gets in. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Palmer” (directed by Fisher Stevens)
Distributor: AppleTV+
Where to Find It: Streaming on AppleTV+

Casual-viewing comfort food that offers just enough flavor to satisfy anyone with a taste for it, this modest AppleTV+ original only defies expectations by sticking to its strengths, trusting in the simple power of its storytelling, and not trying to offer anything more than what’s advertised on the tin. The plot is predictable but well-measured, the characters are familiar but full of life, and the paternal bond that forms between the titular ex-con and a vulnerable seven-year-old-boy — ice-cold at first, but soon to thaw before our eyes — powers a sweetly believable portrait of two outcasts who give a sense of belonging to each other. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Saint Maud” (directed by Rose Glass)
Distributor:
A24
Where to Find It:
Select theaters, with PVOD premiere on Epix to follow on February 12

A slender but unholy cross between “First Reformed” and “The Exorcist,” Rose Glass’ taut and trembling “Saint Maud” transmutes a young woman’s spiritual crisis into such a refined story of body horror that genre fans might feel like they’re having a religious experience. Of course, even the most overzealous viewers will find there’s always room for doubt — and that’s where the Devil gets in. A palliative care nurse in a dreary town somewhere along the British coast, the intensely devout Maud (a divine Morfydd Clark) is doing her best to seal the area around her soul. That seems to be one hell of a struggle. Soft-spoken but vibrating with serial killer intensity, Maud seldom opens her mouth when she’s not talking to God inside her acetic little apartment, reminding her lord and savior that she was meant for something greater. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Supernova” (directed by Harry Macqueen)
Distributor: Bleecker Street
Where to Find It: Select theaters

The sad reality of watching someone you love disappear before your eyes is rarely captured with the restraint found in “Supernova,” Harry Macqueen’s aching dementia drama starring Stanley Tucci and Colin Firth as a couple staring down their autumn days. Closer in spirit to the literary “Away from Her” than the sentimental “Still Alice,” “Supernova” doesn’t center on the particulars of what dementia does to the mind and body, but instead maps out the painful road ahead as the pair find meaning in their remaining time together. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Dear Comrades” (directed by Andrei Konchalovsky)
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema through the film’s virtual cinema page

The subject of “Dear Comrades!” stretches across the decades: On June 2, 1962, Soviet soldiers opened fire on workers in the city of Novocherkassk who were protesting for better living conditions and lower food prices. The Novocherkassk massacre ended with 26 people dead and buried in secret by KGB officials; it wasn’t until a 1992 investigation that the full scope of the violence came to light. Director Andrei Konchalovsky doesn’t need to follow the story that far. Instead, “Dear Comrades!” hovers in the immediacy of the disaster, with the vivid black-and-white saga of a Communist Party official whose own daughter goes missing in the chaos. Brimming with anger and intrigue, this fiery historical drama from a veteran Russian filmmaker revisits the tragedy with fresh immediacy, and gives it a human face. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Week of January 18 – January 24

New Films on VOD and Streaming (And in Select Theaters)

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Derek DelGuadio’s In & Of Itself” (directed by Frank Oz)
Distributor: Hulu
Where to Find It: Streaming on Hulu

Make no mistake: Derek DelGaudio’s remarkable one-man show, which enjoyed a lengthy Off-Broadway run between 2017 and 2018, has ample card tricks, optical illusions, and even one extraordinary teleportation bit. All along, however, DelGaudio transforms the usual shock-and-awe routine into a powerful meditation on existential yearning and his own bumpy quest for meaning in life. By inviting his audience into a meaningful process of self-discovery that stems from his own upbringing, “In & Of Itself” suggests a lyrical alternative to Tony Robbins-style rabble-rousing with an autobiographical twist that grows more sophisticated and awe-inspiring as it moves along. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Human Factor” (directed by Dror Moreh)
Distributor: Sony Pictures Classics
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Much of the world views the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a fixed problem with no end in sight. Few can explain why, but “The Human Factor” finds those who can. With the white-knuckle intensity of a first-rate political thriller, Israeli filmmaker Dror Moreh’s engrossing documentary tracks glacial efforts to broker a peace deal over the past three decades. “The Human Factor” drills down on the fluctuating tensions between Yasser Arafat and Israel’s revolving door of leadership. By speaking exclusively to the handful of negotiators involved in America’s efforts to broker a deal, Moreh’s focused collection of talking heads and archival footage is limited to a handful of takeaways about what went wrong. It turns out some policy wonks make eloquent storytellers and they excel at putting their own failings in context. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Our Friend” (directed by Gabriela Cowperthwaite)
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures and Universal Pictures Home Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

Gabriela Cowperthwaite’s “Our Friend,” an honest but insistently scattershot true-life tearjerker adapted from the Esquire article of the same name, starts with its most cogent and powerful scene. Dane — a kind, soft, Totoro of a man played by the always sincere Jason Segel — sits on the porch of a Midwestern home and plays a game with two young girls. Inside the house, their parents use the calculated moment of calm to strategize. Matthew Teague (Casey Affleck) sits alone in the frame, stares into the middle distance, and games out how to tell his daughters that their mother is dying. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Preparations to Be Together for an Unknown Period of Time” (directed by Lili Horvát)
Distributor: Greenwich Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus virtual cinema options

Had Jesse and Celine actually met six months after the events of “Before Sunrise” as planned, had they gone horribly wrong to the point where one of the parties couldn’t even remember the other, and had they both been neurosurgeons, the scenario might look something like “Preparations to Be Together for an Unknown Period of Time.” Such a mouthful of a title, poetic and unwieldy, belies the starkness of Hungarian writer/director Lili Horvát’s haunting and mysterious second feature, a kind of amnesiac love story crossed with the gloomiest of Krzysztof Kieślowski movies, and bordering on existential science fiction. Even if the conceit winds up a little undercooked, and a loopy ending doesn’t quite stick the landing, the filmmaking is exacting and assured, pulling us in like a current into the heart of a most strange romantic mystery. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The White Tiger” (directed by Ramin Bahrani)
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

Like the upwardly mobile character at its core, “The White Tiger” works best when it moves quickly and doesn’t bother to look in the rear-view mirror. It opens at full speed, with a flash-forward of three attractive twentysomethings bombing down a barren Delhi boulevard in the middle of the night circa 2007. There isn’t a single clogged pore or care in the world between Ashok (Rajkummar Rao) in the passenger seat and his wife Pinky (Priyanka Chopra Jonas) behind the wheel, but wide-eyed Balram Halwai (Adarsh Gourav) sitting in the back is shedding gallons of flop-sweat as he stares at the dark road ahead. For all Balram’s vigilance, he isn’t able to warn Pinky in time for her to avoid braining the poor little girl who darts out in front of the car. Freeze frame, record-scratch, Balram voiceover: “As far back as I remember, I always wanted to be a driver.” Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“Brothers by Blood” (directed by Jérémie Guez)
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“Flinch” (directed by Cameron Van Hoy)
Distributor: Ardor Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“Ten Minutes to Midnight” (directed by Erik Bloomquist)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

“No Man’s Land” (directed by Conor Allyn)
Distributor: IFC Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD platforms

“Personhood: Policing Pregnant Women in America” (directed by Jo Ardinger)
Distributor: 1091 Pictures
Where to Find It: Various VOD platforms

Films Available via Virtual Cinema

Learn more about virtual cinemas offerings right here.

“Atlantis” (directed by Valentyn Vasyanovych)
Distributor: Grasshopper Film
Where to Find It: Virtual cinema options through Metrograph Live

Valentyn Vasyanovych earned notoriety as the cinematographer behind 2014’s “The Tribe,” but he finds a confident voice all his own as a director with “Atlantis,” his third feature as such but his most striking to date. Conjuring a bombed-out, postwar Ukraine in 2025, the film’s crumbling world eerily mirrors our own, and is barely distant enough to qualify as speculative fiction. Unfolding across austerely shot (by Vasyanovych himself) tableaux with ruinous production design that brings to mind the industrially fed-on environments of the “Fallout” video games or even Tarkovsky’s “Stalker,” “Atlantis” is a political howl from the soul about a decaying Europe. But its cold, violent exterior turns out to be a bleak disguise for what is an unexpectedly sweet love story at its molten core. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Identifying Features” (directed by Fernanda Veladez)
Distributor: Kino Lorber
Where to Find It: Virtual cinema options through Kino Marquee

Fernanda Valadez’s feature directorial debut “Identifying Features” takes its seemingly tear-jerking concept one beset by knotty bureaucratic issues, painful language barriers, and the sense of further danger around every bend and turns it into an artfully made and unflinching rumination of life on the margins. Valadez’s story (co-written with the film’s editor Astrid Rondero) could easily have inspired a familiar tale of shattered lives against the backdrop of immigration issues and Mexican cartel violence. Instead, “Identifying Features” eschews the usual tropes. The result is a drama rooted in liminal explorations and unanswerable questions, as confounding as it is satisfying. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Notturno” (directed by Franco Rossi)
Distributor: NEON and Super LTD
Where to Find It: Choose your local cinema on the film’s virtual cinema page

At one lyrical interval in Gianfranco Rosi’s “Notturno,” a fisherman paddles his small boat down a river lit by the rising sun. Something seems off: the sky stays dark too long, and the distant star burns too brightly. Once the discharge of automatic weapons becomes more prominent in the sound mix, however, we realize that such explosive light is no sun at all — and that for the figures given the spotlight in Rosi’s sober and hypnotic portrait of daily life in the war-torn Levant, violence is just another natural, unremarkable part of the landscape. That sequence, mind you, is something of an outlier in this elliptical doc, which the director and cinematographer shot over the course of three years on the borders between Iraq, Kurdistan, Syria and Lebanon. Despite the sound of gunfire off in the distance, “Notturno” is less a film about life during wartime than the life that subsequently follows it, as those damaged by the violence try to move forward. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Also available this week:

“1982” (directed by Oualid Mouaness)
Distributor: Utopia
Where to Find It: Various virtual cinema options, inlcuding Laemmle

Check out more information about new releases on the next page.

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