Medchart raises $17M to help businesses more easily access patient-authorized health data

Darrell Etherington
·5 min read

Electronic health records (EHR) have long held promise as a means of unlocking new superpowers for caregiving and patients in the medical industry, but while they've been a thing for a long time, actually accessing and using them hasn't been as quick to become a reality. That's where Medchart comes in, providing access to health information between businesses, complete with informed patient consent, for using said data at scale. The startup just raised $17 million across Series A and seed rounds, led by Crosslink Capital and Golden Ventures, and including funding from Stanford Law School, rapper Nas and others.

Medchart originally started out as more of a DTC play for healthcare data, providing access and portability to digital health information directly to patients. It sprung from the personal experience of co-founders James Bateman and Derrick Chow, who both faced personal challenges accessing and transferring health record information for relatives and loved ones during crucial healthcare crisis moments. Bateman, Medchart's CEO, explained that their experience early on revealed that what was actually needed for the model to scale and work effectively was more of a B2B approach, with informed patient consent as the crucial component.

"We're really focused on that patient consent and authorization component of letting you allow your data to be used and shared for various purposes," Bateman said in an interview. "And then building that platform that lets you take that data and then put it to use for those businesses and services, that we're classifying as 'beyond care.' Whether those are our core areas, which would be with your lawyer, or with an insurance provider, or clinical researcher — or beyond that, looking at a future vision of this really being a platform to power innovation, and all sorts of different apps and services that you could imagine that are typically outside that realm of direct care and treatment."

Bateman explained that one of the main challenges in making patient health data actually work for these businesses that surround, but aren't necessarily a core part of, a care paradigm, is delivering data in a way that it's actually useful to the receiving party. Traditionally, this has required a lot of painstaking manual work, like paralegals poring over paper documents to find information that isn't necessarily consistently formatted or located.

"One of the things that we've been really focused on is understanding those business processes," Bateman said. "That way, when we work with these businesses that are using this data — all permissioned by the patient — that we're delivering what we call 'the information,' and not just the data. So what are the business decision points that you're trying to make with this data?"

To accomplish this, Medchart makes use of AI and machine learning to create a deeper understanding of the data set in order to be able to intelligently answer the specific questions that data requesters have of the information. Therein lies their long-term value, since once that understanding is established, they can query the data much more easily to answer different questions depending on different business needs, without needing to re-parse the data every single time.

"Where we're building these systems of intelligence on top of aggregate data, they are fully transferable to making decisions around policies for, for example, life insurance underwriting, or with pharmaceutical companies on real-world evidence for their phase three, phase four clinical trials, and helping those teams to understand, you know, the overall indicators and the preexisting conditions and what the outcomes are of the drugs under development or whatever they're measuring in their study," Bateman said.

According to Ameet Shah, partner at co-lead investor for the Series A Golden Ventures, this is the key ingredient in what Medchart is offering that makes the company's offering so attractive in terms of long-term potential.

"What you want is both depth and breadth, and you need predictability — you need to know that you're actually getting the full data set back," Shah said in an interview. "There's all these point solutions, depending on the type of clinic you're looking at, and the type of record you're accessing, and that's not helpful to the requester. Right now, you're putting the burden on them, and when we looked at it, we were just like 'Oh, this is just a whole bunch of undifferentiated heavy lifting that the entire health tech ecosystem is trying to solve for. So if [Medchart] can just commoditize that and drive the cost down as low as possible, you can unlock all these other new use cases that never could have been done before."

One recent development that positions Medchart to facilitate even more novel use cases of patient data is the 21st Century Cures Act, which just went into effect on April 5, which provides patients with immediate access, without charge, to all the health information in their electronic medical records. That sets up a huge potential opportunity in terms of portability, with informed consent, of patient data, and Bateman suggests it will greatly speed up innovation built upon the type of information access Medchart enables.

"I think there's just going to be an absolute explosion in this space over the next two to three years," Bateman said. "And at Medchart, we've already built all the infrastructure with connections to these large information systems. We're already plugged in and providing the data and the value to the end users and the customers, and I think now you're going to see this acceleration and adoption and growth in this area that we're super well positioned to be able to deliver on."