Will the Mar-a-Lago affidavit be released?

·5 min read

The Mar-a-Lago search warrant might be released, but the judge wants to see it first. A star quarterback settled with the NFL over sexual misconduct allegations. And a gigantic moth was seen in the U.S. for possibly the first time ever.

👋 It's Laura Davis. It's Thursday. And it's time for the news.

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Judge orders DOJ to redact Mar-a-Lago affidavit for possible release

A federal magistrate Thursday set up the possible release of a heavily-edited version of the Justice Department affidavit authorizing the search of former President Donald Trump’s Florida estate, ordering government lawyers to provide him with a redacted copy by next week. U.S. Magistrate Bruce Reinhart said he would decide after receiving the redacted copy of the detailed document that the government used as the basis for its search. Here's the latest.

Top Trump exec pleads guilty in tax fraud scheme: Allen Weisselberg, Trump Organization CFO, pleaded guilty to 15 criminal tax fraud charges Thursday in a deal that could potentially make him a star witness against the company at a trial this fall. Here's the story behind the plea deal.

Deshaun Watson suspended 11 games, fined $5 million

The NFL and Deshaun Watson have reached a settlement. The Cleveland Browns quarterback will serve an 11-game unpaid suspension, pay a $5 million fine and undergo professional evaluation and treatment as part of a settlement with the NFL following accusations of sexual misconduct, the league said Thursday. The agreement overrides an Aug. 1 ruling that Watson should serve a six-game suspension — but falls well short of the NFL's proposed yearlong ban. Watson was sued by 24 women who said he sexually harassed and coerced them during massage therapy sessions during his time with the Houston Texans. Keep reading.

What everyone's talking about

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Mass killings: High-profile shootings are only part of the story

Uvalde. Sandy Hook. Virginia Tech. Horrific public mass shootings often take over the news, but these tragedies are only a small part of mass killings in the U.S. An analysis of every mass killing since 2006 shows that victims are usually killed by someone they know, often in their own homes. Most mass killers use handguns, not assault-style rifles. USA TODAY partnered with the Associated Press and Northeastern University to publish a comprehensive database that has tracked every mass killing resulting in four or more victim fatalities since 2006. Explore the database here.

The number of mass killings in 2022 is about average compared with previous years despite recent shootings that captured public attention. The number of victims is somewhat higher than average but still below previous highs.
The number of mass killings in 2022 is about average compared with previous years despite recent shootings that captured public attention. The number of victims is somewhat higher than average but still below previous highs.

What happens when you can't hear the sounds of war?

The sounds of war are almost inescapable in Ukraine. But for thousands there who are deaf or hard of hearing, those danger signals just don't exist. Off-The-Grid Missions, a U.S-based nonprofit, is now providing that community with tools to stay alert, such as solar-powered lights, cellphone chargers and drinking water filters. The group also provides evacuations run exclusively by people who are deaf or hard of hearing. It reflects a growing understanding that the needs of people with disabilities must be considered in disaster preparation plans. Read more about how they're helping.

Ukranian resident Ludmila Mykolaivna Surikova, who is deaf, shows off a bottle of clean drinking water produced using a filter provided by the U.S.-based nonprofit Off-The-Grid-Missions, which provides disaster assistance to deaf and hard-of-hearing people.
Ukranian resident Ludmila Mykolaivna Surikova, who is deaf, shows off a bottle of clean drinking water produced using a filter provided by the U.S.-based nonprofit Off-The-Grid-Missions, which provides disaster assistance to deaf and hard-of-hearing people.

Real quick

Giant moth spotted in US for the first time

Welcome to America, moth! The atlas moth, which can have a wingspan up to 14 inches, was found in the U.S. for the first time last month, Washington state officials said. The massive moth usually lives in tropical regions, so sightings of the creature in the U.S. are extremely rare – and were thought to be nonexistent. On July 7, a University of Washington professor reported spotting an atlas moth, which is now believed to be the first confirmed detection ever reported in the U.S. Read more about the atlas moth here.

An atlas moth was found in Bellevue, Wash., on July 7.
An atlas moth was found in Bellevue, Wash., on July 7.

A break from the news

Laura L. Davis is an Audience Editor at USA TODAY. Send her an email at laura@usatoday.com or follow along with her adventures – and misadventures – on Twitter. Support quality journalism like this? Subscribe to USA TODAY here.

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Mar-a-Lago search, Deshaun Watson, Ukraine aid, mass killings, atlas moth. It's Thursday's news.