Lidl Ordered to 'Destroy' Gold Chocolate Bunnies After It Loses Copyright Case with Lindt

2EJ61RC Lidl bonny chocolate for Easter on sale
2EJ61RC Lidl bonny chocolate for Easter on sale

Alamy Stock Photo

Lidl was ordered to stop selling its gold foil-wrapped chocolate bunnies after the Federal Supreme Court of Switzerland found the company had violated the trademark from Lindt & Spruengli.

On Thursday, the court ruled the Swiss-founded chocolatier and confectionery company won copyright protection against the German retailer based on the results of opinion polls submitted by the company.

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The Lindt bunny has a red ribbon and bell, while the Lidl bunny sports a yellow or green ribbon. Even though there were certain differences between the two products, there was still the risk of confusion for customers, the ruling from the court added, according to CNN.

2H4E7AX Easter chocolate bunnies are stocked inside a Lidl supermarket in London. Issue date: Thursday April 2, 2020.
2H4E7AX Easter chocolate bunnies are stocked inside a Lidl supermarket in London. Issue date: Thursday April 2, 2020.

Alamy Stock Photo

"Destruction is proportionate, especially as it does not necessarily mean that the chocolate as such would have to be destroyed," the court said in a statement, per the outlet.

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The court also appeared to suggest the chocolate doesn't necessarily have to go to waste but could potentially be reused.

In 2000, Lindt was granted the copyright status for its chocolate bunnies and has since fought in courts multiple times to protect one of its best-selling products.