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Lidia Bastianich's Tip For Ensuring Perfectly Juicy Steak

Lydia Bastianich in kitchen
Lydia Bastianich in kitchen - Bobby Bank/Getty Images

For such a supposedly simple dish — a cut of meat, at its very best, without too many trimmings to overpower its natural flavor — the perfect steak continues to pose a challenge. There are so many different cuts, some better than others, and so many different ways to cook steak that folks can start to feel overwhelmed.

It's easy to make mistakes when preparing and cooking steak, but luckily, there are talented chefs across the world who are willing to share their expertise with us. Lidia Bastianich, an experienced restaurateur and award-winning TV host  (along with other big names in the steak game), recently shared her tips for rustling up the perfect steak with Business Insider,

For Bastianich, it's all in the cut and age of the meat and, most importantly, how well you use the steak's natural juices during the cooking and serving process to ensure a flavorful, juicy finish.

Read more: 12 Little-Known Facts About Salt

Baste Your Steak After Carving For Maximum Juiciness

Sliced steak with rosemary.
Sliced steak with rosemary. - Zoya Miller SVG/Shutterstock

Bastianich recommends a T-bone or Porterhouse steak, aged for two or three weeks, with a little bit of protective fat left on, that has been. It's also vital, she says, to make sure the meat is cut evenly. If you have an unevenly cut steak, you'll have an unevenly cooked steak — and nobody wants that.

Place the steak on a hot grill and cook to your preferred level of doneness. Keep some of the juices from the pan, and leave your steak to rest. Resting your steak before carving it ensures it retains as much of its juices as possible. Just 10 minutes of rest can save up to six tablespoons of liquid!

Once you've cut your steak, it's time to apply the crowning glory of Bastianich's technique. Drizzle the steak's juices and a splash of extra virgin olive oil over the sliced meat. After that, all there is to do is dig in.

Read the original article on Mashed.