Latest updates from the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral

PA
·10 min read

The nation is saying farewell to the Duke of Edinburgh during a televised funeral at St George’s Chapel in Windsor Castle following his death last week at the age of 99.

The Queen is leading a small group of close family and friends at the service for her husband of 73 years.

Covid regulations have reduced the scope of the service with public elements cancelled, mourners reduced from around 800 to just 30 and all guests wearing face masks and sitting apart.

Here are the latest updates:

3.35pm

In a statement posted just after the minute of silence at 3pm, the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award wrote on Instagram: “Thank you, Your Royal Highness, for the incredible legacy you leave through (the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award), empowering young people across the world with the skills, confidence and resilience to make the most of life and make a difference to the world around them.”

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3.30pm

WATCH: Senior royals walk in the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral procession

3.23pm

Duke of Edinburgh funeral
The Queen and the Duke of York during the funeral (Yui Mok/PA)
Duke of Edinburgh funeral
Mourners, including, front row, from left, the Duchess of Cambridge, the Duke of Cambridge, the Earl of Wessex, Viscount Severn, Lady Louise Mountbatten-Windsor, and the Countess of Wessex (Dominic Lipinski/PA)

3.20pm

Duke of Edinburgh death
People observe the national minute’s silence outside Buckingham Palace (Jacob King/PA)[caption id="2.59237571" align="alignnone" width="3500"] Scenes outside Buckingham Palace as the funeral got under way (Jacob King/PA)

3.17pm

The Queen during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh
The Queen during the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh (Jonathan Brady/PA)

3.15pm

Members of the Leeds PHAB Club observed the silence outside the Prince Philip Centre, which is named after the duke.

Philip visited the centre at least four times since he was instrumental in starting it in 1969.

Just six members and volunteers gathered for a socially-distanced observance of the silence due to Covid restrictions.

Ann Hart, honorary secretary of the PHAB club which brings together disabled and abled-bodied people from across Leeds, was among the group.

Mrs Hart, who met Philip three times, said: “He was just an absolutely fantastic man.

“He was really interested in anything you did. He wanted to know the be-all-and-end-all of everything.”

3.12pm

Duke of Edinburgh's funeral: seating plan
(PA Graphics)

3.10pm

David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, said in the Bidding: “We are here today in St George’s Chapel to commit into the hands of God the soul of his servant Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

“With grateful hearts, we remember the many ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us.

“We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen, by his service to the nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith.

“Our lives have been enriched through the challenges that he has set us, the encouragement that he has given us, his kindness, humour and humanity.

“We therefore pray that God will give us grace to follow his example, and that, with our brother Philip, at the last, we shall know the joys of life eternal.”

3.03pm

A round fired by the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery signalled the start of the national one-minute silence and another booming volley marked its end.

The Royal Marines carried the coffin up the steps and at the top it was received by the Dean of Windsor David Conner, who will conduct the funeral, and the Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby.

Members of the royal family who took part in the procession followed the coffin as it was carried into the chapel and put on face masks before walking in pairs through the nave and into the quire behind the coffin.

Senior royals walk behind the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin
Senior royals walk behind the Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin (Hannah McKay/PA)

2.56pm

The Dukes of Cambridge and Sussex walked in the procession as they approached St George’s Chapel.

The pair were either side of their cousin Peter Phillips.

The brothers wore black and walked in silence.

2.54pm

Members of the royal family already at St George’s Chapel watched from the Galilee Porch entrance and bowed their heads as the procession passed.

Princess Eugenie arrives for the funeral
Princess Eugenie arrives for the funeral (PA)

The Queen’s vehicle stopped at the entrance and she joined the other mourners.

2.58pm

Duke of Edinburgh funeral
The Queen arrives for the funeral (Jonathan Brady/PA)
Duke of Edinburgh funeral
The Duke of Cambridge, the Duke of York, the Duke of Sussex, the Earl of Wessex and Forfar and the Prince of Wales (Alastair Grant/PA)

2.50pm

The Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral procession has set off with the coffin followed by senior royals led by the Prince of Wales and Princess Royal.

Walking behind the royal family are members of Philip’s household while in front of the coffin are the Services chiefs.

Every minute of the procession, which will last eight minutes, a gun will be fired by the King’s Troop Royal Horse Artillery from the East Lawn of Windsor Castle.

Also in the procession are the Earl of Wessex, Duke of York, Duke of Sussex, Peter Phillips, Duke of Cambridge, Vice Admiral Tim Lawrence and the Earl of Snowdon.

2.45pm

The Queen has left Windsor Castle to attend the funeral of her “beloved” husband the Duke of Edinburgh.

It is the first time she has been officially seen in public since she announced Philip died peacefully last Friday morning at Windsor.

The national anthem was played by military musicians after the Queen, joined by a Lady-in-Waiting, left the Sovereign’s entrance.

A Bentley carrying the head of state and her Lady-in-Waiting took up its place at the back of the funeral procession.

2.43pm

The Duke of Edinburgh’s coffin has been seen in public for the first time as a bearer party of Grenadier Guardsmen carried it from Windsor Castle to a Land Rover Defender hearse.

The duke’s coffin could be seen draped with his personal standard, which pays tribute to his birth heritage as a Prince of Greece and Denmark, his family name and his Edinburgh title.

The first three quarters show his lineage – with blue lions and red hearts on a yellow background representing Denmark, a white cross on blue representing Greece, and his anglicised family name Mountbatten represented with two black “pales” or stripes on white.

The fourth quarter contains the arms of the City of Edinburgh.

Philip was made the Duke of Edinburgh shortly before his wedding in 1947, by his future father-in-law George VI.

2.40pm

The Duchess of Cornwall, Duchess of Cambridge and Countess of Wessex have arrived for the funeral.

Duke of Edinburgh funeral
(Justin Tallis/PA)
Duke of Edinburgh funeral
(Justin Tallis/PA)
Duke of Edinburgh funeral
(Justin Tallis/PA)

2.37pm

Philip’s custom-built Land Rover Defender hearse, designed by the duke and modified over 16 years, has been driven into the castle’s quadrangle and has stopped outside the Equerries’ entrance.

The modified Jaguar Land Rover that will carry the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh arrives for his funeral
The modified Jaguar Land Rover that will carry the coffin of the Duke of Edinburgh arrives for his funeral (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

The Defender TD5 130 chassis cab vehicle was made at Land Rover’s factory in Solihull in 2003, the year he turned 82.

With its heavy-duty wheels and angular structure, the polished sturdy, utilitarian vehicle stands as a showcase for the duke’s practical nature and his passion for functional design and engineering.

Chief of the Defence Staff General Sir Nicholas Carter, who is head of UK Armed Forces, along with the heads of the Army, RAF and Royal Navy, walked from the Equerries’ entrance and took up positions by the State entrance and faced the Land Rover.

2.35pm

The card on a wreath left for the Duke of Edinburgh by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex in St George’s Chapel was handwritten by Meghan, who is watching the funeral on television from her home in the US.

Meghan and Harry personally chose the locally-sourced flowers for their tribute – including Acanthus mollis (Bear’s breeches), the National flower of Greece, to represent Philip’s heritage and Eryngium (Sea Holly), to represent the Royal Marines.

The wreath also features Campanula for gratitude and everlasting love, Rosemary to signify remembrance, Lavender for devotion, and Roses in honour of June being Philip’s birth month.

Meghan, who is expecting her second child was watching the proceedings from more than 5,000 miles away in California after doctors advised her not to fly.

2.30pm

Members of the royal family have appeared in public for the first time during the funeral, with those not taking part in the procession travelling by car the short distance from the castle to St George’s Chapel.

Among the group were the Duchess of Cornwall, Duchess of Cambridge, Countess of Wessex and her children Viscount Severn and Lady Louise Windsor.

Zara and Mike Tindall, Princess Beatrice and her husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank also travelled by car.

They were joined by the Queen’s first cousins Princess Alexandra, the Duke of Gloucester and the Duke of Kent, who loyally supported the monarch and Philip by carrying out royal duties over the years.

2.25pm

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2.15pm

The duke’s favourite driving carriage, accompanied by two of his grooms, was pulled by his two trusty black Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm, to stand in the Quadrangle, ready for the procession to pass by.

Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm pulling the Duke of Edinburgh’s driving carriage
Fell ponies, Balmoral Nevis and Notlaw Storm pulling the Duke of Edinburgh’s driving carriage (Kirsty O’Connor/PA)

It was a poignant reminder of Philip’s love of the fast-paced sport, which he took up when he turned 50 and continued to enjoy non-competitively in his 90s.

The polished dark green aluminium and steel four-wheeled carriage was built to the duke’s exact specifications eight years ago, and he began using at the age of 91 for riding around Windsor and other royal estates.

The duke’s cap, whip and brown gloves lay on the seat of his favourite driving carriage as it was brought into the quadrangle.

2.05pm

The Chief of the Defence Staff, General Sir Nick Carter, said the funeral for the Duke of Edinburgh will be a “sombre moment” but also a “celebratory moment” of a life well-lived.

“I think there won’t be a serviceman or servicewoman on parade today who won’t have their chest swelling with pride,” he told Sky News.

“We all have a huge regard for him. We have a huge regard for his wartime record and the care that he showed for veterans and for those still serving, and it’ll be a sombre moment for us, but it will also be a celebratory moment, I think, because it was a special life and a life that was well-lived.”

The Foot Guards Band march into position ahead of the funeral
The Foot Guards Band march into position ahead of the funeral (Leon Neal/PA)

2pm

Baron Parker, who is the Lord Chamberlain – the most senior official in the Queen’s household and in overall charge of the funeral, has moved to the inner hall where the duke’s coffin is lying.

He has been joined by David Conner, the Dean of Windsor, who will conduct the service, and retired Admiral Sir James Francis Perowne, Constable and Governor of Windsor Castle.

1.56pm

Police hold back the crowds as a coach arrives outside St George’s Chapel
Police hold back the crowds as a coach arrives outside St George’s Chapel (Justin Tallis/PA)
The Foot Guards Band march ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle
The Foot Guards Band march ahead of the funeral of the Duke of Edinburgh at Windsor Castle (Alastair Grant/PA)

1.52pm

First Minister of Wales Mark Drakeford has sent a flower wreath to the Duke of Edinburgh’s funeral to offer “sincere condolences” on behalf of the country.

The wreath, made out of white chrysanthemums and red roses, is accompanied by a short message written in English and Welsh by Mr Drakeford.

The message says: “On behalf of the government and people of Wales.

“Cydymdeimlad diffuant – Sincere condolences.”