King Charles and Queen Camilla Attend Church Service in Scotland Following Queen's Funeral

King Charles III and Camilla Queen Consort depart Crathie Kirk after Sunday service
King Charles III and Camilla Queen Consort depart Crathie Kirk after Sunday service

Stuart Wallace/Shutterstock

King Charles III and Queen Camilla are continuing one of Queen Elizabeth's cherished traditions.

The new King, 73, and Queen Consort, 75, were seen driving to church in Scotland on Sunday, heading to Crathie Kirk near Balmoral Castle. The royal couple was dressed in black as the royal mourning period for Queen Elizabeth continued before officially ending the following day.

King Charles and Queen Camilla have been in Scotland for nearly a week. The two headed north on September 20, the day after Queen Elizabeth's state funeral at Westminster Abbey and committal service at St. George's Chapel at Windsor Castle.

Their trip to Crathie Kirk, the go-to church for the British royal family while in Scotland, is a continuation of an outing that the Queen regularly took while staying at Balmoral Castle, where she "peacefully" died on September 8.

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Crathie Parish Church
Crathie Parish Church

Mark Cuthbert/UK Press via Getty Crathie Parish Church

The couple is believed to be staying in their Birkhall home, which is on the Balmoral estate. Charles has described the early 18th-century home as "a unique haven of cosiness and character."

Charles and Camilla have spent their summers at the residence, often getting involved in the local community. Some of their favorite activities include "fishing and walking in the Scottish countryside," according to the website.

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The King and Queen Consort also spent their honeymoon at the property, according to the BBC.

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On Friday, a poignant portrait of the new monarch was released, showing the King hard at work in Buckingham Palace with the famous red box of documents needing his attention on September 11, just three days after Queen Elizabeth's death.

In a scene so often associated with Queen Elizabeth, King Charles sat at a desk and attended to the daily dispatch of papers from leaders around the U.K., Commonwealth and world.

Behind Charles was a black and white photograph of his late parents, Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip. It was given by the couple to her father, King George VI, for Christmas in 1951 — the last holiday season before he died in February 1952.

The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until 7th October 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 23, King Charles III carries out official government duties from his red box in the Eighteenth Century Room at Buckingham Palace, London.
The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until 7th October 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 23, King Charles III carries out official government duties from his red box in the Eighteenth Century Room at Buckingham Palace, London.

Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty King Charles

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Though the national period of mourning for Queen Elizabeth has ended in the U.K., her family remained in mourning until one week after the funeral, a wish King Charles expressed soon after her death.

Members of the Royal Household Staff, related representatives and troops with ceremonial duties will also honor this period of grievance, Buckingham Palace said.