Kansas City Big Slick highlights: Chiefs’ ‘dumb video,’ movie star antics, gratitude

·3 min read

Perhaps this scene sums up Saturday night’s Big Slick Virtually Talented Show:

Chiefs players Patrick Mahomes and Travis Kelce went on video and juggled footballs for a few seconds, dropped them, laughed and then expressed their love for Children’s Mercy hospital.

Afterward, host Paul Rudd commented, “It’s nice to know that the greatest quarterback in the game and the greatest tight end in the game can still find time to record a dumb video. For the kids.”

For their contribution to the Big Slick Virtually Talented Show, Chiefs Patrick Mahomes, left, and Travis Kelce juggled footballs for a few seconds in a video. Paul Rudd summed it up: “It’s nice to know that the greatest quarterback in the game and the greatest tight end in the game can still find time to record a dumb video. For the kids.”
For their contribution to the Big Slick Virtually Talented Show, Chiefs Patrick Mahomes, left, and Travis Kelce juggled footballs for a few seconds in a video. Paul Rudd summed it up: “It’s nice to know that the greatest quarterback in the game and the greatest tight end in the game can still find time to record a dumb video. For the kids.”

For the second year in a row, the Big Slick fundraiser for the hospital’s Cancer Center was all online because of the pandemic.

Via Zoom for 90 minutes, Rudd and his fellow hometown hosts Jason Sudeikis (minus his “Ted Lasso” mustache), Eric Stonestreet, Rob Riggle and David Koechner served as emcees for their famous guests.

Big Slick hosts, clockwise from top left, Rob Riggle, Paul Rudd, Jason Sudeikis, David Koechner and Eric Stonestreet took to Zoom to host the Virtually Talented Show on Saturday.
Big Slick hosts, clockwise from top left, Rob Riggle, Paul Rudd, Jason Sudeikis, David Koechner and Eric Stonestreet took to Zoom to host the Virtually Talented Show on Saturday.

The conceit was that the celebrities were submitting audition tapes to be a part of the show. And the Virtually Talented Show lived up to its name with some unapologetically lame videos:

In snippets throughout the show, Shazam himself, Zachary Levi, joined Kat McNamara (who grew up in Lee’s Summit and stars on “Arrow”) and David Dastmalchian (who grew up in Overland Park and will play supervillain Polka-Dot Man in “Suicide Squad 2”) played a game of hangman.

“The Davids” — Dastmalchian, who co-starred with Rudd in the “Ant-Man” movies, and David Wain, who co-starred with Rudd in “Role Models” — wore Ant-Man flame suits and danced to Jimi Hendrix’s “Let Me Stand Next to Your Fire.”

Actor Will Forte told lame dad jokes to his new baby girl, Zoe.

A whole slew of stars, including Steve Carell, Jeff Daniels, Chris Noth, Melissa Gilbert, Courtney B. Vance, Daniel Dae Kim and Tony Goldwyn, took turns overacting as they try to tell Sherlock Holmes who the real killer is before they, too, are murdered.

And another Chief, offensive lineman Kyle Long, showed off his “three-ball slide,” gliding across, count ’em, three exercise balls on his stomach.

The musical guests were a bit more polished.

Blue Springs native David Cook performed an acoustic cover of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’.”
Blue Springs native David Cook performed an acoustic cover of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’.”

After a video showing a Children’s Mercy patient who is alive today thanks to the care she received, David Cook, the Blue Springs native who won “American Idol,” played an acoustic version of Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin.’”

The Brothers Osborne played their breakthrough hit “Stay a Little Longer” and said they were looking forward to seeing their Kansas City fans again this fall (Nov. 11 at Arvest Bank Theatre at the Midland).

Jay DeMarcus and Joe Don Rooney of Rascal Flatts sang “I Will Stand By You” and then the more upbeat “Life Is a Highway.”

Rudd had the last word, saying, “We couldn’t be more appreciative. Thank you. Thank you for sitting through this. And for giving.”

This year’s fundraising total was not yet available. Last year’s Big Slick at Home fundraiser brought in $2,072,420, a total surpassed only by the $2.5 million of 2019 and $2.1 million the year before. The event has raised more than $12 million for Children’s Mercy in the previous 11 years.

Donations can still be made at bigslickkc.org. And Saturday’s show is still available on Youtube.com/BigSlickKC and Facebook.com/BigSlickKC.

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