Jordan Peterson Admits He's Wrong On Jim Jefferies Show

Sima Shakeri
University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson appears on the Jim Jefferies Show.

Jordan Peterson is known for a lot of things: his opposition to Bill C-16, which adds protection for gender expression to the Human Rights Act, his fight against political correctness, his suggestion that "enforced monogamy" can reduce outbursts of violent misogyny, and his sometimes-rabid supporters that are known for jumping to his defense and — in some instances — threatening his detractors.

One thing he is not known for is admitting when he's wrong.

But Australian comedian Jim Jefferies managed to get the University of Toronto professor to do just that on his June 19 show.


In the clip, Jefferies asks Peterson if people should be forced to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding — referencing a recent Supreme Court case in the United States.

"Making them do it? I don't think that's a very good idea," Peterson responds.

Jefferies then asks Peterson if bakers should be allowed to deny a cake to black people if they don't like them either.

Peterson notes that they probably should be allowed to even if it isn't morally right.

Why is that different than now if you didn't want to make a cake for black people?

Jefferies goes on to say that the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s forced business owners to serve black patrons, objectively making American society better.

Peterson agrees that it was the right thing to do, and that's when Jefferies loops the conversation back to the original cake debate.

Earlier from HuffPost Canada:


"Why is that different than now if you didn't want to make a cake for black people?"

"Maybe it's not different. Maybe I was wrong about that."

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