Jan. 6 committee meeting, vaccine mandates, Tokyo Olympics: 5 things to know Tuesday

·5 min read

Committee on Jan. 6 Capitol riot meets publicly for first time

A House committee will begin delving into the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol Tuesday, in an attempt to find out who organized and funded a deadly insurrection that threatened to stop the peaceful transition of power. It's the first public hearing of the panel appointed by House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to investigate the attack that left five people dead. The panel, featuring seven Democrats and two Republicans, is led by Rep. Bennie Thompson, D-Miss. – who has the power to subpoena – and includes Republican Reps. Liz Cheney and Adam Kinzinger, both critics of former President Donald Trump who voted to impeach him. The Justice Department has charged 535 people in the first six months after the insurrection and continues to pursue investigations.

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Funeral for Estelle Hedaya, last victim ID'd in Florida condo building collapse

More than a month after a horrifying condo building collapse in Surfside, Florida, authorities on Monday identified the last victim as 54-year-old Estelle Hedaya. Her younger brother, Ikey Hedaya, confirmed the news to The Associated Press and her family described the four-week wait to get the confirmation as torturous. A funeral was scheduled for Tuesday. A total of 98 people were killed June 24 when the 12-story Champlain Towers South condominium building crashed to the ground. Ninety-seven bodies were pulled from the debris and one person died at a hospital. County officials accounted for 242 people who had lived in the complex. The final identification came just days after rescuers announced they had officially concluded the assiduous and strenuous task of removing layers of dangerous debris and pulling out dozens of bodies.

COVID-19 infections double at VA facilities as agency mandates vaccines for employees

A new order from the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs is in effect Tuesday, saying vaccines are mandatory for its health care workers because of concerns about the Delta variant. The requirement, announced Monday, made the federal agency the first to enlist such a mandate and came as coronavirus infections have more than doubled in the past month at VA medical facilities, a USA TODAY review found. The vaccine mandate came as the more infectious Delta variant continues its spread across the country, leading to spikes, outbreaks and the reinstatement of some COVID-19 restrictions in certain areas.

US women's gymnastics team competes in Tokyo without Simone Biles

Tuesday's action at the Tokyo Olympics will be headlined by one of the most anticipated events of 2021 — the women's gymnastics team final. After a not-so impressive qualifying round, the Simone Biles-led team was looking to reclaim its status as heavy favorites and win a third consecutive team gold medal. In a shocking development however, Biles left the competition after struggling to land a vault. USA Gymnastics spokeswoman Carol Fabrizio said it was "due to a medical issue." Her departure means the U.S. women will have to rely on their three remaining gymnasts – Grace McCallum, Jordan Chiles and Sunisa Lee. Tuesday has already seen plenty of exciting events as 17-year-old American Lydia Jacoby stunned swimming fans and experts by winning the women's 100 breaststroke, Naomi Osaka was upset in the third round of the tennis tournament and the U.S. women's basketball team defeated Nigeria, but showed it has some things to work out as the tournament goes on.

Southwest monsoon rain brings drought relief, but also flooding

Monsoon rain in the Southwest is putting a dent in the extreme to exceptional drought across the region, and portions of Arizona and New Mexico are seeing some of the most significant changes. On Tuesday and over the next couple of days, the monsoon rain threat will diminish across those states, the National Weather Service said, and focus instead on southern portions of California, Nevada and Utah. Although the rainfall helps diminish the drought, it can lead to dangerous floods. "The heavy rain will create mainly localized areas of flash flooding, with urban areas, roads, and small streams the most vulnerable through Tuesday morning," the weather service said.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Capitol riot, meeting, COVID-19, Tokyo Olympics: 5 things to know Tuesday

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