Jan. 6 Committee Chair Says Final Report on Capitol Riots May Be Ready Before Christmas

Committee Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS) (C), Vice Chair Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) (L) and Rep. Stephanie Murphy listen as Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) (not pictured) presents evidence during the seventh hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on July 12, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence related to the January 6, 2021 attack at the U.S. Capitol for almost a year, is presenting its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building in an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for Joe Biden.
Committee Chairman Rep. Bennie Thompson (D-MS) (C), Vice Chair Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) (L) and Rep. Stephanie Murphy listen as Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD) (not pictured) presents evidence during the seventh hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on July 12, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence related to the January 6, 2021 attack at the U.S. Capitol for almost a year, is presenting its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building in an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for Joe Biden.

Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty

The final report of the U.S. House committee investigating the riots of Jan. 6, 2021 might be published before Christmas, according to the committee's chair, Rep. Bennie Thompson.

Thompson, a Democrat, told reporters this week there's "a good possibility" that the committee's final report could come out prior to Dec. 25 — and it will be eight chapters long.

"The body of the report is complete and there is general agreement on that," Thompson said, CNN reports.

RELATED: Assaulting Secret Service, Throwing Ketchup on Walls: The Biggest Bombshells from Tuesday's Jan. 6 Hearing

The bipartisan committee is working to wrap up its investigation prior to January, when the GOP regains control of the House following the midterm elections, which likely put an end to the probe.

The committee's hearings, which began airing publicly in June, have featured new revelations about the events leading up to the attacks and how former President Donald Trump and his allies responded.

Among the most notable allegations are that "multiple" Republican lawmakers contacted the Trump administration seeking presidential pardons in the wake of the attacks, according to committee vice chair Liz Cheney, and that Trump at one point attempted to force his Secret Service agents to drive him to the Capitol building himself.

WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 28: A video of former President Trump's motorcade leaving the January 6th rally on the Ellipse is displayed as Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 28, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence related to the January 6, 2021 attack at the U.S. Capitol for almost a year, is presenting its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building in an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for Joe Biden. (Photo by Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JUNE 28: A video of former President Trump's motorcade leaving the January 6th rally on the Ellipse is displayed as Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, testifies during the sixth hearing held by the Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol on June 28, 2022 in the Cannon House Office Building in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence related to the January 6, 2021 attack at the U.S. Capitol for almost a year, is presenting its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building in an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for Joe Biden. (Photo by Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Images)

Shawn Thew-Pool/Getty Video of then-President Trump leaving his Jan. 6, 2021 rally in a Secret Service SUV

During her public testimony, Cassidy Hutchinson, the former aide to Trump's chief of staff Mark Meadows, relayed an anecdote from deputy chief of staff Tony Ornato.

According to Hutchinson, Trump became "irate" when he learned the Secret Service did not want him traveling to the Capitol after he delivered a fiery speech to supporters alleging the election had been stolen from him. According to her account, Trump yelled, "I'm the f------ president, take me up to the Capitol now."

"The president then reached up to grab at the steering wheel," Hutchinson said, recalling what she was told.

When Trump's head of Secret Service grabbed the president's arm to tell him not to take over the steering wheel, Hutchinson said Trump then grabbed at the head of Secret Service's "clavicle," gesturing to her own throat to demonstrate what she had been told happened.

In the wake of Hutchinson's testimony, Ornato has reportedly been questioned by the committee several times.

RELATED: 5 Key Moments from the Jan. 6 Capitol Riot Hearing, from Never-Before-Seen Video to Ivanka Trump's Testimony

Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, is sworn-in as she testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection in the Cannon House Office Building on June 28, 2022 in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence for almost a year related to the January 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol, is presenting its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of former President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building during an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for President Joe Biden.
Cassidy Hutchinson, a top former aide to Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, is sworn-in as she testifies during the sixth hearing by the House Select Committee on the January 6th insurrection in the Cannon House Office Building on June 28, 2022 in Washington, DC. The bipartisan committee, which has been gathering evidence for almost a year related to the January 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol, is presenting its findings in a series of televised hearings. On January 6, 2021, supporters of former President Donald Trump attacked the U.S. Capitol Building during an attempt to disrupt a congressional vote to confirm the electoral college win for President Joe Biden.

Brandon Bell/Getty Cassidy Hutchinson

Elsewhere in the hearings, Hutchinson described other moments of anger for Trump, telling the committee that she once walked in to a room in the White House to see a valet cleaning up after Trump had "thrown his lunch against the wall."

"There was ketchup dripping down the wall," she said, and a shattered porcelain plate on the ground. The valet told her that Trump had grown angry after Attorney General Bill Barr fact-checked his false claims of election fraud in an interview with the Associated Press.

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer.

CNN reports that, according to Thompson, the final report will include material the committee has not previously presented to the public.

It remains to be seen where the panel will issue criminal referrals — that matter is "still under consideration," Thompson said — but he added that there is a "good possibility" the report will be published by Dec. 25.