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Inside a Tucson Home Made From Thousands of Glass Bottles

Photo: Jason Marrano

One person’s trash is another person’s treasure. Or perhaps their house, as was the case with a recently listed Tucson, Arizona, home made from thousands of glass bottles. According to Robb Report, the original owners and builders of the 2,700-square-foot abode collected countess tossed bottles from landfills, roadsides, and even the Pepsi corporation to use in the construction of what would become one of the most locally famous properties in the Old Pueblo. Now the vibrant home is for sale, listed through Holly Greenhalgh at Coldwell Banker Realty for $432,500.

A bathroom in the property’s guest cottage
A bathroom in the property’s guest cottage
Photo: Jason Marrano

Appropriately known as the Bottle House, the home was first built by Theodore “Ted” and Meletis “Mel” Bryson. The couple started by constructing a carport, then continued expanding until finishing the entire three-bedroom, three-bathroom house in the late 1960s. The home was updated in the 1980s by a new owner. “The Brysons wanted to preserve the desert around them and not destroy it, so they built around the plentiful ocotillos, saguaros, and other vegetation.” Greenhalgh tells AD.

The dining room in the home features stone walls and built-in cabinetry.
The dining room in the home features stone walls and built-in cabinetry.
Photo: Jason Marrano

Resembling an oversized Lite Bright, the home is constructed from an array of colorful glass bottles—which act a bit like bricks—and mortar. Some areas, like the dining room, are constructed using local rocks and stones, while the flooring is made from concrete and flagstone. Inside are three bedrooms, a dining room, kitchen, office space, and family room. Also on the property is a guest cottage and outdoor kitchen. Mayan and Native American design influences are evident throughout the home thanks to Ted’s interests. “He had a deep love and interest for the ancient cultures and wanted to visit the places that inspired him,” Greenhalgh adds.

A bedroom nook in the main house
A bedroom nook in the main house
Photo: Jason Marrano

Despite its non-traditional construction, the home isn’t all that different to a standard one. Greenhalgh says the indoor temperature has not exceeded 83 degrees during the hottest days in Tucson, even without turning on any air conditioning. While the floors can get cold in the winter, the home does have two working fireplaces, which help warm the space.

Walkways outside offer a colorful path for guests.
Walkways outside offer a colorful path for guests.

According to Greenhalgh, guests who tour the property are often complimentary. “Its a very unique one of a kind type of build with a cavern-like feel. You’re surrounded by stones of various sizes and shapes and the colorful glass bottles that become illuminated at certain times of the day,” she says. “You don’t leave as the same person once you’ve seen it.”

Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest


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