Weather bomb leaves the Maritimes reeling with Newfoundland on deck

·3 min read
Weather bomb leaves the Maritimes reeling with Newfoundland on deck
Weather bomb leaves the Maritimes reeling with Newfoundland on deck

The second bomb cyclone in a week is leaving its mark on Atlantic Canada, with thousands without power in Nova Scotia after blustery winds, heavy snow, ice and blizzard conditions battered the province and rest of the Maritimes Friday night and Saturday morning. Conditions will improve through the day as the weather bomb then sets its eyes on Newfoundland with similar impacts, but throw in heavy rainfall, as well, as the island remains on the warmer side of the storm. More on what's left of the storm as it continues to rake across the Atlantic provinces, below.

SATURDAY: STORM MOVES OUT OF THE MARITIMES, HEAVY RAIN SPREADS OVER NEWFOUNDLAND

The storm will begin to depart the Maritimes through the day on Saturday and focus its effects on Newfoundland during the second half. Because Newfoundlad will be much warmer than its westerly neighbours, precipitation will manifest as rain due to southerly winds pumping above-freezing temperatures over most of the island.

atlsnow
atlsnow

In the Maritimes, the snow at times heavy will end over New Brunswick and western Nova Scotia Saturday morning, and eastern regions of the latter in the afternoon. The highest snowfall amounts in Nova Scotia are over the Annapolis Valley and northern Nova Scotia. Strong northerly winds in conjunction with the fresh snowfall is giving poor visibility in blowing snow and causing power outages. There are currently more than 60,000 without power in Nova Scotia.

By the time it departs, accumulations in the Maritimes will be heaviest in eastern and northern Nova Scotia, where an additional 10-25 cm of snow, with 5-15 cm left to come in southern sections.

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) issued rainfall warnings for Newfoundland’s southern shores and portions of the Avalon ahead of the potential for 50-75 mm of rain.

atlrain
atlrain

“Rain will combine with strong southerly winds and mild temperatures to cause significant snowmelt. The mild temperatures today will plummet tonight causing a possible rapid freeze of any standing water from the rainfall and snowmelt,” ECCC said in the rainfall warning.

Farther north and west, freezing rain and snow will pelt the western and northern sections of Newfoundland. Rain will change to ice pellets or freezing rain before changing to snow Saturday evening. Gusty westerly winds will combine with fresh snow to reduce visibilities in blowing snow.

The heaviest snowfall in Newfoundland will be in northern sections, where blizzard and winter storm warnings are in place. Anywhere from 15-40 cm is expected through Sunday morning.

LOOK AHEAD: ANOTHER STORM ON THE DOORSTEPS

Beyond, briefly turning much colder in the short range, but temperatures quickly rebound early next week. The same system that will impact Ontario and Quebec will track across the region late Monday through Tuesday. This system is expected to bring snow changing to rain across most of the region.

atlmon
atlmon

A wide range in snow totals across the region, depending on how quickly an area sees the changeover from snow to rain, with 2-5+ cm for most of Nova Scotia and P.E.I. and 5-15+ cm for New Brunswick -- higher totals north.

A messy mix of snow, ice and rain for most of Newfoundland. A weaker but messy system expected Wednesday night through Thursday night.

An active pattern and changeable temperatures expected for the rest of January.

Thumbnail courtesy of Cheryl Lynn Hoeg, taken in Beaver Bank, N.S.

Stay tuned to The Weather Network for the latest on this major nor’easter.

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