Heat warning still in effect for Toronto as city extends pool hours

·2 min read
Torontonians cool off at the Sunnyside Gus Ryder Outdoor Pool on Lake Shore Boulevard. Environment Canada said humidex values will exceed 40 degrees on Sunday. (CBC - image credit)
Torontonians cool off at the Sunnyside Gus Ryder Outdoor Pool on Lake Shore Boulevard. Environment Canada said humidex values will exceed 40 degrees on Sunday. (CBC - image credit)

Toronto remains under a heat warning this weekend as humidex values are expected to reach the low 40s.

While maximum high temperatures are forecast to hover around the low 30s, it will feel like 40 degrees or more outside. Minimum temperatures are expected to be the low to mid-20s around nighttime.

Environment Canada says relatively cooler temperatures are expected on Monday.

As a result of the heat wave, the City of Toronto has extended the hours of seven city pools until 11:45 p.m. on Sunday. These are  Alex Duff, Giovanni Caboto, McGregor Park, Monarch Park, Parkway Forest, Smithfield Park, and Sunnyside / Gus Ryder.

CBC
CBC

Heat warnings have been issued in various parts of Canada including southern Ontario, southern Quebec, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island.

Monica Vaswani, a meteorologist with Environment Canada, said the size of the heat wave, while notable, is not unprecedented.

"When we do get heat events, it's basically due to warm air advections, or essentially an area of warm or hot air that's moving up from the south into northern parts — the Canadian provinces," she said "It's not uncommon to see large swaths of that hot, moist air mass."

And this is likely not the last of the heat events, at least not for Ontario, Vaswani said.

"Some indications are suggesting that temperatures throughout the remainder of the month of August, aside from the coming week, may be slightly above normal, so that would indicate the potential for additional heat events to occur before the summer's over," she said.

During these extremely hot and humid periods, residents are advised to watch for signs of heat illness such as swelling, cramps, rash, fainting, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Summer heat to extend into fall

Summer-like conditions will likely linger into the fall season, Vaswani said.

"Given the trend that we've seen over the last couple of years, it does seem that our summers are generally starting a little bit later and lingering into at least September, even mid- to late-September, so I wouldn't be surprised if we see something similar this year," she said.

Heat warnings are issued when high temperatures or humidity levels are expected to pose a risk of illness, such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion.

Young children, pregnant women, older adults, those with chronic illnesses or people working outdoors face the greatest risk, the federal weather agency says.

Stay cool with the following tips, it says:

  • Drink plenty of water even before you feel thirsty.

  • Check on older family members, friends and neighbours.

  • Never leave people or pets inside parked vehicles.

  • Take breaks in cool places if working outdoors.