Georgia's Lieutenant Governor Says He Didn't Vote for Herschel Walker or Raphael Warnock in Senate Runoff

ATLANTA, GA - DECEMBER 18: Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga attends the 38th Annual Atlanta UNCF Mayor's Masked Ball at Atlanta Marriott Marquis on December 18, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia.(photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage); NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 20: Former professional football player Herschel Walker visits the SiriusXM Studios on November 20, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)
ATLANTA, GA - DECEMBER 18: Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-Ga attends the 38th Annual Atlanta UNCF Mayor's Masked Ball at Atlanta Marriott Marquis on December 18, 2021 in Atlanta, Georgia.(photo by Prince Williams/Wireimage); NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 20: Former professional football player Herschel Walker visits the SiriusXM Studios on November 20, 2017 in New York City. (Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images)

Prince Williams/Wireimage; Cindy Ord/Getty Raphael Warnock, Herschel Walker

Georgia's Senate runoff election might be one of the most hotly contested in the country, but the state's lieutenant governor says he is unimpressed with both candidates.

In a Wednesday interview, Republican Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan told CNN's John Berman that he spent "about an hour" waiting in line to vote and, once he made it to the voting booth, was confronted with "the most disappointing ballot I've ever stared at in my entire life."

He continued: "I had two candidates that I just couldn't find anything that made sense for me to put my vote behind, and so I walked out of that ballot box showing up to vote but not voting for either one of them."

RELATED: Georgia Senate Candidates Raphael Warnock and Herschel Walker Will Advance to a December Runoff Election

Georgia Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan speaks to the media in his office during the opening day of the year for the general session of the state legislature, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020 in Atlanta.
Georgia Lieutenant Governor Geoff Duncan speaks to the media in his office during the opening day of the year for the general session of the state legislature, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020 in Atlanta.

John Amis/AP Photo Geoff Duncan

Georgia's Senate runoff, which is set for Tuesday, Dec. 6, comes after Republican Herschel Walker and Democrat Raphael Warnock received nearly equal shares of votes in November's general election, with neither reaching the required 50% vote threshold to win the race outright.

Sen. Warnock, 53, has been down the runoff road before, as the same situation occurred in 2020. The reverend then won during round two in Jan. 2021. It was the first time since 2014 that Democrats gained control of the state, as 35-year-old Jon Ossoff also won for the Democratic Party that year.

The campaign marks the first foray into politics for Warnock's Republican challenger, former football star Walker, who has been mired in controversy in recent months due to allegations that the anti-choice candidate quietly urged two women to get abortions — claims he has vehemently denied.

RELATED: Herschel Walker Abortion Accuser Releases New Evidence, Including Voice Messages: 'I Am Telling the Truth'

Former President Donald Trump hugs Georgia Senate candidate Herschel Walker during his Save America rally in Perry, Ga., on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021.
Former President Donald Trump hugs Georgia Senate candidate Herschel Walker during his Save America rally in Perry, Ga., on Saturday, Sept. 25, 2021.

Ben Gray/AP Photo

Duncan has blamed Walker's failure to win the general election on a close relationship with former President Donald Trump, who endorsed Walker early on in the race.

Speaking on CNN after the elections, Duncan said an association with the former president is a "drag factor," saying, "Everybody who's tightly associated with Donald Trump — and we watched it play out all over the country in these races — certainly watched it play out in Georgia, I mean, the drag factor is tangible."

Never miss a story — sign up for PEOPLE's free daily newsletter to stay up-to-date on the best of what PEOPLE has to offer, from juicy celebrity news to compelling human interest stories

In an op-ed, Duncan further elaborated on his "belief that the continued presence of former President Donald Trump is an inhibitor to our party's success."

"For Walker to salvage a victory," Duncan wrote, he'll need to pick up the phone: "First, dial Mar-a-Lago and ask Trump to stay home."