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What is the future for travel? Listen to The Standard podcast

"Walking on the Baltic beach" by Claudius Henrichs (with added Sustainable Travel logo). (Claudius Henrichs. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.)
"Walking on the Baltic beach" by Claudius Henrichs (with added Sustainable Travel logo). (Claudius Henrichs. Licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0.)

This week in The Standard podcast, sustainable-travel expert Juliet Kinsman talks to Jon Weeks about how extreme weather already impacts where we go when and why, and reveals some upcoming trends that travellers should look out for.

These include small-scale hospitality hacks, such as heated cushions from Stoov,  which the Bingham Riverhouse in Richmond and other hotels are employing to reduce their reliance on fossil fuels. Teun van Leijsen, founder, explains how this small solution speaks to the bigger issues: "As global temperatures rise and fewer people escape to hotter climates for the summer, there will be a vast increase in demand for UK-based hotels,” he says; also predicting that room temperatures might soon be capped at 20 degrees Celsius in order to lessen the hotel sector’s current 1% contribution to global carbon emissions. And we hear about the Tschuggen Collection, a family-owned Swiss hotel group working hard to heighten awareness around our changing climate, and their innovative energy solution at the Valsana hotel in Arosa.

The aviation industry gets a bad rap regarding carbon emissions, of course, so can anything be done? Juliet’s companion piece in the newspaper this week looks at how climate change will transform how we travel forever, and it includes a startling revelation: that we should be getting ready for summer vacations in the Baltics! The article references Oxfam's latest report, “Climate Equality: A planet for the 99%”, highlighting that the emissions of the world’s wealthiest 1% account for more than the poorest 66%. So, will it be considered socially unacceptable to fly by 2035? And are eVTOLs — electric vertical take-off and landing planes — the answer? In the week Virgin Atlantic crossed the Atlantic powered by SAFs, episode 6 examines how scalable Sustainable Aviation Fuel <really> is, and whether a company really has created  biofuel from sewage (it has).

The aviation industry gets a bad rap regarding carbon emissions, of course, so can anything be done? Juliet’s forward-looking piece in the newspaper this week looks at how climate change will transform how we holiday forever — and even posits the Baltics will be where we’ll be taking our summer holidays. The article references Oxfam's latest report, “Climate Equality: A planet for the 99%”, highlighting that the emissions of the world’s wealthiest 1% account for more than the poorest 66%. So, will it be considered socially unacceptable to fly by 2035? And are eVTOLs — electric vertical take-off and landing planes — the answer? In the week Virgin Atlantic crossed the Atlantic powered by SAFs, Jon and Juliet discuss how scalable Sustainable Aviation Fuel <really> is. And is there really a company creating biofuel from sewage? Listen in.

In part two, your Sustainable Travel hosts are joined by The Standard’s lifestyle director, Suzannah Ramsdale, to hear her forecasts for the future of travel, which include more staycationing here in the UK, instead of heading overseas, and a question is posed: can luxury cruises and all-inclusive holidays ever be sustainable? Tune in to the debate to find out the answer - and if you’re still hungry for more on the subject, we’d recommend you watch the documentary The Last Tourist, which tackles the topic of cruises head-on.

There's also the recommendation to watch the documentary The Last Tourist, which tackles the topic of cruises head-on. Outside of coastal health, water, in general, is a big issue your hosts address in the context of climate change. And Suzannah declares more travel here in the UK, instead of heading overseas.

This six-part Sustainable Travel series of The Standard podcast was created to shine a light on how we can travel better, and all episodes are now available to download and listen to on Apple, Spotify and wherever you usually stream your podcasts.