If You Like EPS Growth Then Check Out Central Petroleum (ASX:CTP) Before It's Too Late

·3 min read

For beginners, it can seem like a good idea (and an exciting prospect) to buy a company that tells a good story to investors, even if it completely lacks a track record of revenue and profit. And in their study titled Who Falls Prey to the Wolf of Wall Street?' Leuz et. al. found that it is 'quite common' for investors to lose money by buying into 'pump and dump' schemes.

In contrast to all that, I prefer to spend time on companies like Central Petroleum (ASX:CTP), which has not only revenues, but also profits. While that doesn't make the shares worth buying at any price, you can't deny that successful capitalism requires profit, eventually. In comparison, loss making companies act like a sponge for capital - but unlike such a sponge they do not always produce something when squeezed.

See our latest analysis for Central Petroleum

How Fast Is Central Petroleum Growing Its Earnings Per Share?

In business, though not in life, profits are a key measure of success; and share prices tend to reflect earnings per share (EPS). So like a ray of sunshine through a gap in the clouds, improving EPS is considered a good sign. You can imagine, then, that it almost knocked my socks off when I realized that Central Petroleum grew its EPS from AU$0.0065 to AU$0.039, in one short year. Even though that growth rate is unlikely to be repeated, that looks like a breakout improvement.

Careful consideration of revenue growth and earnings before interest and taxation (EBIT) margins can help inform a view on the sustainability of the recent profit growth. To cut to the chase Central Petroleum's EBIT margins dropped last year, and so did its revenue. That is, not a hint of euphemism here, suboptimal.

You can take a look at the company's revenue and earnings growth trend, in the chart below. For finer detail, click on the image.

earnings-and-revenue-history
earnings-and-revenue-history

Of course the knack is to find stocks that have their best days in the future, not in the past. You could base your opinion on past performance, of course, but you may also want to check this interactive graph of professional analyst EPS forecasts for Central Petroleum.

Are Central Petroleum Insiders Aligned With All Shareholders?

Like that fresh smell in the air when the rains are coming, insider buying fills me with optimistic anticipation. Because oftentimes, the purchase of stock is a sign that the buyer views it as undervalued. However, insiders are sometimes wrong, and we don't know the exact thinking behind their acquisitions.

The first bit of good news is that no Central Petroleum insiders reported share sales in the last twelve months. Even better, though, is that the , Troy Harry, bought a whopping AU$326k worth of shares, paying about AU$0.04 per share, on average. Big buys like that give me a sense of opportunity; actions speak louder than words.

Along with the insider buying, another encouraging sign for Central Petroleum is that insiders, as a group, have a considerable shareholding. Indeed, they hold AU$19m worth of its stock. That's a lot of money, and no small incentive to work hard. That amounts to 23% of the company, demonstrating a degree of high-level alignment with shareholders.

Is Central Petroleum Worth Keeping An Eye On?

Central Petroleum's earnings have taken off like any random crypto-currency did, back in 2017. The cherry on top is that insiders own a bunch of shares, and one has been buying more. This quick rundown suggests that the business may be of good quality, and also at an inflection point, so maybe Central Petroleum deserves timely attention. Still, you should learn about the 3 warning signs we've spotted with Central Petroleum (including 2 which shouldn't be ignored) .

The good news is that Central Petroleum is not the only growth stock with insider buying. Here's a list of them... with insider buying in the last three months!

Please note the insider transactions discussed in this article refer to reportable transactions in the relevant jurisdiction.

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This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. We provide commentary based on historical data and analyst forecasts only using an unbiased methodology and our articles are not intended to be financial advice. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

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