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Burberry Teams With Highgrove Gardens, Holly Mills for Third Collaboration

LONDON — Burberry is strengthening its ties with Highgrove, the private residence of King Charles III, with a third collection of scarves and trenchcoats in collaboration with the artist Holly Mills.

The artist, a graduate of the Royal Drawing School, drew her inspiration from the king’s meadow during the summer. The scarves and linings of the trenchcoats include his favorite flower, the delphinium.

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The scarves and trenchcoats are available to purchase from Burberry’s website and global stores, as well as Highgrove Gardens’ website and stores.

Burberry's third collaboration with Highgrove Gardens
Burberry’s third collaboration with Highgrove Gardens.

Burberry has held a warrant from Queen Elizabeth II for trenches and weatherproof clothing since the 1950s. It holds another warrant from King Charles for clothing.

The brand said it “shares the commitment of The King’s Foundation” and to support the “arts, passing the legacy of craft and artistry to the next generation.”

Ahead of the king’s coronation last year, Burberry partnered with Highgrove Gardens on a limited-edition scarf made from organic silk featuring the architecture of the garden with silver birch and magnolia trees, as well as birds and dragonflies, wildflowers such as delphinium, yellow rattle, snowdrop, ox-eye daisy, early purple orchids and fritillary.

Burberry's third collaboration with Highgrove Gardens
Burberry’s third collaboration with Highgrove Gardens.

The collaboration is a token of shared values between Burberry and Highgrove Gardens with an emphasis on the environment, nature and craftsmanship — all of which the king has supported with his charity The Prince’s Trust.

In the wake of the queen’s death in 2022, Burberry chief executive officer Jonathan Akeroyd said the late monarch “will forever be remembered with deep admiration, respect and affection by everyone at Burberry. We join the royal family in mourning her loss.”

More than 800 companies, in Britain and elsewhere, are Royal Warrant holders, supplying goods and services to the royals. Although these companies do not have to follow royal protocol and pause business, many of them made the decision to do so.

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