Biden pardons federally convicted marijuana users. Here's where marijuana laws stand in each state

President Joe Biden announced Thursday he would pardon people federally convicted of simple possession of marijuana, a measure seen as a strong statement on how such offenses should be handled.

The president’s historic gesture could affect more than 6,500 people but does not affect those convicted at the state level, where most such convictions occur. Biden is hoping states will follow suit.

The notion of legalizing marijuana at the federal level has been gaining steam in recent years, and many states have already approved the substance for medicinal purposes, with a handful giving the OK to recreational use.

Before he was elected, Biden had called for marijuana decriminalization on the campaign trail and in April pardoned nine federal offenders.

Where in the US is medical marijuana allowed?

According to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML), 37 states and the District of Columbia all have laws permitting marijuana for medical use, as do four U.S. territories – Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands.

A dozen states permit limited access to products with low THC, the substance with the greatest impact on a person’s mental state.

In what states is weed legal?:The complete list

Where in the US is recreational use of marijuana permitted?

Nineteen states and the District of Columbia have approved adult possession and consumption of marijuana, as have Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands, according to NORML.

Opinion: America is ready for marijuana reform. Biden's pardon announcement proves it.

Which states have decriminalized marijuana offenses?

According to NORML, 27 states have partially or fully decriminalized some offenses for marijuana possession. That means that possession of small amounts of marijuana for personal consumption is treated similarly to a minor traffic violation, with no arrest, prison time or criminal record for first-time offenders.

Four states – Minnesota, North Carolina, North Dakota and Ohio – have partially decriminalized possession, meaning that while the acts are still considered criminal offenses, they carry no threat of jail time.

Where does my state stand on marijuana use?

Here’s where each state stands on marijuana use, according to NORML:

Alabama – medical marijuana use permitted

Alaska – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Arizona – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Arkansas – medical marijuana use permitted

California – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Colorado – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Connecticut – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Delaware – medical marijuana use permitted

District of Columbia – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Florida – medical marijuana use permitted

Georgia – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Hawaii – medical marijuana use permitted

Idaho – marijuana use illegal

Illinois – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Indiana – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Iowa – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Kansas – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Kentucky – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Louisiana – medical marijuana use permitted

Maine – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Maryland – medical marijuana use permitted

Massachusetts – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Michigan – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Minnesota – medical marijuana use permitted

Mississippi – medical marijuana use permitted

Missouri – medical marijuana use permitted

Montana – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Nebraska – marijuana use illegal

Nevada – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

New Hampshire – medical marijuana use permitted

New Jersey – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

New Mexico – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

New York – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

North Carolina – allows only limited access to low-THC products

North Dakota – medical marijuana use permitted

Ohio – medical marijuana use permitted

Oklahoma – medical marijuana use permitted

Oregon – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Pennsylvania – medical marijuana use permitted

Rhode Island – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

South Carolina – allows only limited access to low-THC products

South Dakota – medical marijuana use permitted

Tennessee – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Texas – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Utah – medical marijuana use permitted

Vermont – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Virginia – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

Washington – allows personal possession and consumption of marijuana by adults, medical marijuana use permitted

West Virginia – medical marijuana use permitted

Wisconsin – allows only limited access to low-THC products

Wyoming – allows only limited access to low-THC products

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: How many states have legalized marijuana? Cannabis laws unpacked