Arizona Police Bust Catalytic Converter Thief

·2 min read

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He had a quarter million in cats stashed at his house…

Catalytic converter theft is hardly a new thing, but it’s been experience a huge surge in the past two or so years and the problem is vexing people all over. Yet another big bust, this time in Prescott, Arizona, is helping to highlight how out of control the situation has become recently. Police say they seized over $250,000 worth of stolen catalytic converters stashed at a home.

Check out another huge catalytic converter theft bust here.

That’s right, a quarter million dollars in cats were hidden away in Prescott, of all places. Thanks to detectives from the Arizona Department of Public Safety Vehicle Task Force, Yavapai County Sheriff’s Office, and Prescott Police Department, this alleged criminal operation was taken down on September 8.

It all started with the task force serving a search warrant on the property of 39-year-old Todd Dawkins. Investigators found about 350 catalytic converters on the property, which are worth about $250,000, which is why thieves will just climb under your car with a Sawzall and hack them right off.

Dawkins is facing several felony and misdemeanor charges related to fraudulent schemes and artifices, trafficking in stolen property, illegal control of an enterprise and money laundering, according to the Arizona Department of Public Safety.

Another big catalytic converter theft operation was busted up by police in Houston, Texas. Local media caught on camera authorities hauling out hundreds of cats from a house. Allegedly, a man and others set up a sophisticated crime ring, recruiting other to chop off catalytic converters and sell them to the men, who would turn around and resell them for even more money.

One of the more popular targets for catalytic converter thefts have been Toyota Priuses, full-size trucks like the Ford F-150 and Chevy Silverado, and other common models such as the Honda Accord, Toyota Camry, and Ford Econoline.

Photos via Arizona Department of Public Safety

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