Animal shelter in Charlotte needs newspapers to line cages for cats, small dogs

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Cats and small dogs at Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control need some good reading material to line their cages, according to staff.

The shelter has over 200 cages that are lined each day with fresh newspaper, spokeswoman Melissa Knicely told The Charlotte Observer. One cage might use an entire section of the newspaper, she said.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control needs full and fresh newspapers to line the cages of cats and small dogs housed at the shelter.
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control needs full and fresh newspapers to line the cages of cats and small dogs housed at the shelter.

“We are using so much we are running low,” Knicely said.

The shelter goes through about 50 full newspapers a day, she said.

RELATED: More dogs killed as Charlotte shelter runs low on space, staff

“Some animals prefer the entertainment section, while others prefer the to keep up with the Panthers and Hornets in the Sports section,” Knicely said.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control goes through about 50 newspapers a day to line the cages of cats and small dogs.
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control goes through about 50 newspapers a day to line the cages of cats and small dogs.

‘It’s been very, very hard’

Capacity remains a concern with 24 cats, 53 kittens, 138 dogs and 24 puppies currently being housed, according to Knicely. There are no feline leukopenia cases following the outbreak last month, she said.

There are 24 cats, 53 kittens, 138 dogs and 24 puppies being housed at Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control as of Wednesday, Aug. 10. Cats and small dogs need newspapers to line their cages.
There are 24 cats, 53 kittens, 138 dogs and 24 puppies being housed at Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police’s Animal Care and Control as of Wednesday, Aug. 10. Cats and small dogs need newspapers to line their cages.

The shelter’s space issues contributed to a 40% jump earlier this summer in the number of dogs that were put down or euthanized, the Observer reported last week. During June and July, the average number of dogs euthanized was just over 3, according to records provided by animal control.

“It’s been very, very hard because we’re about life saving here,” Knicely said last week.

People can adopt or foster animals, or bring newspapers to the shelter at 8315 Byrum Drive.