Amber Heard Claims Johnny Depp Would 'Draw Blood' When He 'Often' Self-Harmed During Fights

·4 min read
Amber Heard Claims Johnny Depp Would 'Draw Blood' When He 'Often' Self-Harmed During Fights

Amber Heard claimed that ex-husband Johnny Depp would sometimes cut himself during arguments they had.

While continuing her testimony Monday, the Aquaman actress, 36, said Depp, 58, would "often" self-harm himself in front of her during disagreements, increasingly so toward the end of their tumultuous relationship.

"He did that often," she said. "... I almost called 911 in New York in 2014, August of 2014 I believe, because I thought he had done himself an injury. He often, in fights, would cut his arms or hold a knife to his chest or draw blood, superficially at first. But later, in like 2016 — especially as our relationship was ending. He also put cigarettes out on himself. He'd flick them at me and once or twice tried to put one out on me, but mostly he would do it while screaming at me."

"He once did it right in front of me, screaming at my face as he put the cigarette out on his cheek," said Heard.

The actress said Depp would never ask her about any of the scars, bruises or injuries she says sustained from the abuse he inflicted on her during their relationship. She has also testified to multiple instances of physical violence and sexual assault. Depp testified that he has never struck Heard or any woman.

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In audio played earlier in the trial, Depp was heard threatening to cut himself with a knife as Heard begged for him to stop. The incident happened in July 2016, when Depp said Heard asked to meet with him privately in San Francisco just months after getting a domestic violence restraining order against him and filing for divorce that May.

Depp testified that he was "quite confused" about the hotel room meetup "since all the news was just about the fact that I had allegedly done all these horrible things to her."

RELATED: Legal Expert Says Fan Support of Johnny Depp on Social Media 'Means Nothing for the Case'

Mandatory Credit: Photo by Steve Helber/POOL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock (12942408d) Actors Amber Heard and Johnny Depp watch as the jury comes into the courtroom after a break at the Fairfax County Circuit Court in Fairfax, Virginia, USA, 16 May 2022. Johnny Depp's 50 million US dollar defamation lawsuit against Amber Heard that started on 10 April is expected to last five or six weeks. Depp v Heard defamation lawsuit at the Fairfax County Circuit Court, USA - 16 May 2022
Mandatory Credit: Photo by Steve Helber/POOL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock (12942408d) Actors Amber Heard and Johnny Depp watch as the jury comes into the courtroom after a break at the Fairfax County Circuit Court in Fairfax, Virginia, USA, 16 May 2022. Johnny Depp's 50 million US dollar defamation lawsuit against Amber Heard that started on 10 April is expected to last five or six weeks. Depp v Heard defamation lawsuit at the Fairfax County Circuit Court, USA - 16 May 2022

Steve Helber/POOL/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

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"I was talked into going there and met with her in hopes that she would retract her lies that the world was now fed. In no way was she ready to do that, and I couldn't understand why I was there — everything had been taken from me, my children couldn't escape the fact that all this had gone down," he told the jury.

He said he felt Heard brought him to that meeting "under false pretenses" and, after the fallout of the allegations against him, he was "really just at the end, just at the end; I couldn't take it anymore."

"I don't know what she was after, so I had a knife in my pocket and I just took the knife out and said, 'Here — cut me, that's what you want to do. Ultimately you've taken everything. You want my blood? Take it. Have my blood.' And then she said, 'No, no' and then I said, 'Look, if you're not going to take it and you want it, I know you want it — that's all I've got left — take it.' If she wasn't going to do it, I would've done it because that's psychologically, emotionally where I was. I was at the end, I was broken."

Actor Johnny Depp arrives into the courtroom at the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse in Fairfax, Virginia, on May 16, 2022. - Actor Johnny Depp sued his ex-wife Amber Heard for libel in Fairfax County Circuit Court after she wrote an op-ed piece in The Washington Post in 2018 referring to herself as a "public figure representing domestic abuse." (Photo by Steve Helber / POOL / AFP) (Photo by STEVE HELBER/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
Actor Johnny Depp arrives into the courtroom at the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse in Fairfax, Virginia, on May 16, 2022. - Actor Johnny Depp sued his ex-wife Amber Heard for libel in Fairfax County Circuit Court after she wrote an op-ed piece in The Washington Post in 2018 referring to herself as a "public figure representing domestic abuse." (Photo by Steve Helber / POOL / AFP) (Photo by STEVE HELBER/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)

STEVE HELBER/POOL/AFP via Getty

Depp is suing Heard for defamation over a 2018 op-ed she wrote for The Washington Post about surviving domestic violence, though she never mentioned Depp by name in the article. Depp originally filed the $50 million lawsuit in March 2019.

He testified that his "goal is the truth" as he seeks to clear his name in the trial, which is being televised live via various outlets. Ahead of the trial, Heard said in a statement that "hopefully when this case concludes, I can move on and so can Johnny. I have always maintained a love for Johnny and it brings me great pain to have to live out the details of our past life together in front of the world."

Back in November 2020, Depp lost his highly publicized U.K. libel lawsuit case against British tabloid The Sun for calling him a "wife-beater." The court upheld the outlet's claims as being "substantially true" and Heard testified to back up the claims. In March 2021, his attempt to overturn the decision was overruled.

If you are experiencing domestic violence, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233, or go to thehotline.org. All calls are toll-free and confidential. The hotline is available 24/7 in more than 170 languages.

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