There are 2 Atlantic systems — and one may become a tropical depression, forecast says

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Forecasters are monitoring two disturbances in the Atlantic, including one that is likely to turn into a tropical depression by early next week.

One of the disturbances was just inland over Africa Thursday, dumping rain over the Guinea Highlands. The tropical wave was expected to move off the west African coast later Thursday and could develop over the next few days as it moves west across the Atlantic at about 15 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

As of the 8 p.m. advisory, the system’s chances of becoming a tropical depression climbed to a 40% chance in the next 48 hours and a 70% chance of formation through the next five days.

The other tropical wave carried a broad area of disorganized showers and thunderstorms over the central Atlantic. Its formation chances held steady at 20% through the next five days.

“Environmental conditions are expected to be marginally conducive for some slow development east of the Lesser Antilles by early next week while the disturbance moves west-northwestward at 10 to 15 mph,” forecasters wrote in the 2 a.m. Thursday advisory.

A tropical wave that is expected to roll off Africa’s west coast later Thursday is likely to strengthen into a tropical depression late Saturday or early Sunday.
A tropical wave that is expected to roll off Africa’s west coast later Thursday is likely to strengthen into a tropical depression late Saturday or early Sunday.

NOAA this week updated its prediction for the number of storms to expect this year and is now calling for 15 to 21 named storms, an increase from May when it called for 13 to 20 named storms. NOAA’s prediction for the number of hurricanes (7 to 10) and major hurricanes (3 to 5) didn’t change.

The next storm name is Fred.

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